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25

What you saw is the thrust reverser of the engine, which redirects some of the airflow forwards and therefore helps slowing the aircraft down. The grid like structure are the cascade vanes. This is what it looks like inside the engine: (Airbus A380 FCOM - Engines - Thrust Reverser System) The blue arrows indicate the flow of the so called bypass air, which ...


12

It's the reverse thrust door opening. I will get back to you with a picture. Courtesy By Pieter van Marion from Netherlands - PH-BVC KLM, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29588152 For a brief explanation, once the aircraft has touched down (and in some cases even before it touches down) there are a set of doors and vanes which ...


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Basically, operating ETOPS/EDTO takes into consideration worst-case scenario situations (EMER ELEC CONFIG) where you will only have ELAC1 working. In addition, its mentioned that ELAC2 in MEL is a NO-GO item due to the logic behind the system operation where it will allow ELAC2 to work first always, and in case ELAC2 fails ELAC1 will take over. According to :...


1

To answer your question the limit is 1mm. It cant be less than this value. At lengths greater than this value brake wear can be measured without any specific brake temperature value. However at values less than 1mm Airbus has a specific brake temperature of 60 degrees Celsius to measure the brake wear. At high brake temperatures the heat from the carbon ...


1

TLDR: The FMGC position is a mix of GPS and IRS (called GPIRS), but the IRS position is aligned to the airport reference coordinate, not to the GPS position. The difference you observe is between the FM position and the MIX IRS position. This difference is called the bias. Position Computation Each FMGC computes its own aircraft position (called the "...


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As you said, it will vary by airline. Mine has a few screens, and the pilots enter in number adults and children in each seating zone, number of total infants, number of standard and heavy items in cargo, any additional weight in cargo (shipping cargo, mail, ballast, etc). Also the desired runways to get data for and their condition (dry, wet, snow, etc). ...


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