49

That's where the analogue/backup compass is stowed. The compartment can be opened downward if you ever need to use the compass, as seen in this image:


44

Position lights are only visible in certain sectors (see image). The red and green lights on the wings are not supposed to be visible from behind. Image source: Learn to fly


36

There are three position lights. Red, Green and White. The red and green ones are placed on the wings and should be visible from the front and side up to an angle of ±110 degrees from the longitudinal axis. The white light is usually placed on the tail (or trailing edge of the wings) and should be visible from behind the aircraft, 70 degrees to either side. ...


35

The white marks make it easy to see if the trim wheel is moving, which would be tricky if it was entirely black. But wouldn't the pilot always know if they was spinning the trim wheel? Remember that the autopilot can also adjust the trim, which might not be obvious to the pilot. The visual marks make it easy for the pilots to see what the autopilot is doing....


32

The answer is no, not totally, but it would really slow things down. I don't think anybody knows the precise answer because only flat water ditchings seem to result in the airplane stopping in the water in one piece (such as 1549 and a similar one in Malaysia) and flat water incidents (like Malaysia and some airport overruns) are usually in shallows where ...


28

I'm going to simplify and assume that jets and cars burn the same fuel, and output the same exhaust, CO2, NOx and all. I'm going to compare only short-haul flights against cars. According to Wikipedia, an A-320-NEO does 1.95L/100km per seat. Assuming flying at 80% capacity, that gives us 2.4L/100km per seat. According to The Car Guide, a 2019 Honda Civic ...


27

The only reason for your flight to operate at such low altitude is because it is cheaper for them to do so. As you said it is due to weather, other route/altitude may not be available. They can cancel the flight but that is likely to be costly. They may have to find accomodation for you and crew until they can put you to the next flight. Sub-optimal flight ...


26

I used the playback function of Flightradar24 for the 18th at 23:00 UTC, and the amount of traffic above 10,000' (filtering by altitude) seemed very normal compared to other days. I'm baffled as to why they flew so low, but I can address your fuel question in some detail. The difference in fuel consumption is ~693 kg of fuel, and would cost an extra ~$415, ...


21

The “toothed” exhaust are called Chevrons and they reduce noise. They are an option on CFM56 equipped A321 aircraft. Wikipedia CFM International CFM56 ”GE and Snecma also tested the effectiveness of chevrons on reducing jet noise. After examining configurations in the wind tunnel, CFMI chose to flight-test chevrons built into the core exhaust nozzle. The ...


21

The A320 and 737 have very different flight control architectures. The 737 has physical cables that transmit pilot (or autopilot) input directly to the hydraulic actuators. This was common in the 1960's when the airplane was first designed. This means that the airplane handling comes down to the aerodynamics and the pilot input. The 737 MAX presented an ...


20

The 737 was originally designed to be a smaller aircraft serving more regional routes. The original JT8D low-bypass turbofans easily fit under the wings, and allowing the plane to sit lower to the ground made it easier for the plane to operate at smaller airports without support equipment. Passengers could use the built-in air stairs and the cargo bay was ...


17

In theory, yes. In practice, no. FAA regulations (specifically, 14 CFR 25.801(d)) require that, under reasonable water-landing conditions, an airplane must remain afloat long enough for the occupants to evacuate. Most airplane manufacturers don't actually test the ditching performance of their aircraft, but instead rely on the clause of paragraph (c) to ...


16

You need to even realize that you have to push a button to talk. Not everyone grew up with ham radio, CB radio, or walkie-talkies, especially nowadays where everybody has a mobile phone. You need to find the PTT button. You need to select where you want your headset to be routed: you can talk to your co-pilot, you can talk to ground crew, you can talk to the ...


16

Both are in taxiing SOP. The reason is in case the spoilers were accidentally left extended on the flight before (or during a maintenance check before the flight by the line engineers). If that's the case, then pressing MAX while taxiing before checking the flight controls (spoilers included) will engage the full RTO brakes and surprise the crew, injure a ...


16

It was because they could get there faster on a "TEC route." IFR flights are subject to congestion management at the ARTCC level, which means they have to wait their turn in line to be allowed into the airspace. That used to be done with holds (and still is in many other countries), but the US will slow down aircraft, reroute them or even delay takeoff to ...


13

It depends on what you mean by "environmentally friendly." Just for an example, let's consider a 1000 mile trip. An A320 burns about 5 gallons of fuel per seat per hour, and with 150 seats this comes to 750 gallons per hour. A 1000 mile flight will take about 2.5 hours, so this comes to 12.5 gallons per seat, or 1875 gallons total. This means that 2 seats ...


11

The A320 saw entry into service on 18 April 1988 with Air France. About a year later Flight International covered the dispatch topic. For British Airways – whose initial acquisition of the A320 was through the British Caledonian takeover, and not an order – the problems weren't with the plane, but with the Boeing culture that had to adapt. Otherwise there ...


9

Here's an answer for the B737, from own work compiled from several public sources. The A320 and other airliners are very similar. The air conditioning packs are Air Cycle Machines (ACM) which remove heat from air through a reverse Brayton cycle. Hot compressed air is cooled and then expanded, which drops the outflow temperature to a temperature cold enough ...


9

While not specific to an A320, nor a make/model of automobile, these averages may help put your question into perspective. How any of it relates to "environmentally friendly" is purely subjective. "...the average fuel consumption in 2017 was 34 pax-km per L (2.94 L/100 km [80 mpg‑US] per passenger)..." from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


8

The short answer is: Yes, there is less vertical space under the wing of a 737 Max compared to an A320neo. In the image below I have put the two airplanes side to side and the height difference is very apparent. Please note that the images are from the respective predecessors of the aircraft. The only thing that has changed regarding the height is that the ...


8

Short answer: This is very normal because the outer wing is thinner. The warm fuel (which is warmed by the IDG) is not always returned to outer/inner tanks. Some explanation is needed wrt the circulation function on the A320. Excerpts below will be denoted (M) and (F), for maintenance and flight manuals, respectively. The FADEC controls the fuel return ...


8

The 737 Max had short landing gear. Since the engines need to have a minimum ground clearance, this meant that the new larger engines had to be repositioned further forwrd and higher on the wing. The repositioned engine along with the new engine nacelle shape meant it had different flying characteristics at high angles of attack (eg due to airflow). Thus ...


8

They're starting the chronometer. This chronometer is displayed on the navigation display. It lets them keep track of the time limit they are allowed to operate at takeoff thrust. The limit is 5 minutes normally extended to 10 with an engine failure. After this, they must reduce power to the maximum continuous thrust setting (MCT). There is also a time ...


8

This is a so called aspirated TAT sensor, optional on the Airbus. Air is being drawn through aspirated TAT sensors to ensure that they correctly indicate the temperature even when the aircraft is not moving. Normal TAT sensors develop a bias when the aircraft is static. This video gives a nice explanation.


7

You assume that the lower attack angle of the unflapped, aileron-containing portion of the wing should allow the ailerons to deflect further without stalling. but that only looks at the geometric angle of attack. What counts, however, is the induced angle of attack. Since the flaps on the inner wing create much more lift, the induced angle of attack is ...


7

It would probably be a single point of failure if one engine wouldn't be enough to deice both wings. For this reason there is a cross bleed selector so that the remaining engine can feed the wing on the opposing side. Here is a link to a computer based training video of the A320 explaining that a single engine bleed is enough for both wings but not for ...


7

As per the A320 flight manual (§127.20 p3), the maximum permitted total pitch alteration in normal law depends upon speed, aircraft mass, CoG, and other factors: Pitch Attitude Limitation: Pitch attitude is limited to: 30º nose up in conf 0 to 3 (progressively reduced to 25º at low speed) 25º nose up in conf FULL (progressively reduced ...


6

In my particular case: I probably did 10 minutes of demonstrating mechanical backup during inital type rating I cannot remember for sure, but it never reappeared in any reccurent sim, and even if I did it was definitelly not part of the syllabus, just something one of us pilots wanted to try. There are several reasons for that: Airbus deffinitelly ...


6

OK, what you call "mechanical law" isn't a "law", it's mechanical signalling. So it needs steel cables from somewhere in the cockpit to whatever chosen flight controls. The A320 already uses steel cables for the Rudder - that's how it's normally signalled. So there's no extra work involved in doing this. For pitch control, the Stab Trim Wheel is never used ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible