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51 votes

Do airplanes really expose their internal wires and electronics like this on the wings when braking?

You will have both hydraulic system plumbing lines, the metal pipes, and wiring harnesses running along the rear spar, serving hydraulic actuators and electrical components like sensors and servos, ...
John K's user avatar
  • 132k
46 votes

Why would an F-35 take off with air brakes behind the cockpit extended?

That is not the air brake, but the cover for the vertical air intake on the F-35B model, which is operated by the RAF.
WPNSGuy's user avatar
  • 9,077
28 votes

Can an airliner with no brakes be slowed down after landing by steering it into the grass?

Depends on what the alternative is. Hopefully you're going fairly slow when you get to that point. In any case, if the choice is between grass and a drop off into a ravine, go for the grass. If the ...
John K's user avatar
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17 votes
Accepted

Why are the speed brakes on the F-86 deployed when parked?

The F-86 Sabre Pilot's Flight Operating Manual is availlable on Google books site. It describes the speed brake system as being operated by the utility hydraulic system. Both extension and retraction ...
Jpe61's user avatar
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16 votes
Accepted

Do all 767-200s have speedbrakes that deploy automatically upon touchdown?

All B757 and B767 aircraft have speedbrakes that can be deployed automatically. But you need to manually arm them first. You also need weight on wheels(truck tilt) and both thrust levers at idle, ...
Mike Sowsun's user avatar
  • 37.8k
14 votes

Why would a fighter use the afterburner and air brakes at the same time?

While the pictures above are most likely a result of the reason posited by ymb1 (showing off max blast while staying subsonic for the crowd), using afterburner with speedbrakes to reduce weight is a ...
JBP Jr's user avatar
  • 141
12 votes

Do airplanes really expose their internal wires and electronics like this on the wings when braking?

To complement things mentioned in other answers and comments, in particular the mention of the underside of a car, here is what the undercarriage well looks in a Boeing 737: Neither these pipes and ...
Martin Argerami's user avatar
7 votes

Do airplanes really expose their internal wires and electronics like this on the wings when braking?

Are those cables and electronics? Cables, yes. Electronics, no, other than a few sensors. Just exposed right into the air like that? Yes! Air is neither corrosive nor an electrical conductor under ...
dotancohen's user avatar
  • 6,377
7 votes

Why does this regional jet have its air brakes wide open before touchdown?

Primary reason is speed control. The thrust output of a jet engine does not have a linear relationship to the gas core or fan speed and the most effective thrust range is somewhere between 75-100% N1....
Romeo_4808N's user avatar
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7 votes

Do airplanes really expose their internal wires and electronics like this on the wings when braking?

With the flaps set to a fully deployed landing position, and the spoilers raised, you can get a pretty good view of the flap well. The side with all the “cables and electronics” is in fact the outside ...
Romeo_4808N's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

When, exactly, were the DC-8’s airbrakes removed?

The DC-8 is equipped with emergency air brake system. This isn't the type of air brakes you might expect on an airplane, but rather on a truck. The captain could pull a handle on the instrument panel ...
fooot's user avatar
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6 votes

Exactly when do the ARMED Speed Brakes extend after landing a B737-800?

The system will extend the flight spoilers when any strut (either main gear or the nosewheel) compresses; the ground spoilers deploy after the right main gear strut compresses. Everything will deploy ...
Ralph J's user avatar
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5 votes

Why would an F-35 take off with air brakes behind the cockpit extended?

The airbrake is not a single piece on the F35, like the F15 have. That is just a fan cover for the F35 hovering variant. For airbrake, the F35 use the rudders, flaps and ailerons all at the same time.
George Geo's user avatar
  • 2,111
5 votes
Accepted

Do the speed brakes on an F-16 change its pitch?

Because the speed brakes are tail mounted, and because they deploy upwards and downwards equally, pitch should not change. The airplane's fly-by-wire system likely dampens any slight pitch changes ...
Camille Goudeseune's user avatar
5 votes

Why do some aircraft (e.g. Avro RJ85) have rear-mounted air brakes?

They have them mounted at the rear fuselage because they work better, and because there isn't a set of stabilisers mounted there: the stabilisers are mounted on top of the vertical tail, in a T-tail ...
Koyovis's user avatar
  • 61.8k
5 votes

Why do some aircraft (e.g. Avro RJ85) have rear-mounted air brakes?

The Avro RJ100 does have something on its wings- three spoilers on each, though these act exclusively as lift dumpers after touchdown (and another two for roll control). It is perfectly possible to ...
aeroalias's user avatar
  • 100k
4 votes
Accepted

What prevents aircraft with a tailcone APU from using tail-mounted airbrakes?

Yes indeed, it is possible to combine an APU with air brakes at the rear of the fuselage. The defining factor is not the presence of an APU, but that of a T-tail. Aircraft with a conventional set of ...
Koyovis's user avatar
  • 61.8k
4 votes

Why does this regional jet have its air brakes wide open before touchdown?

The Fokker F-28/F70/F100 and the BAe 146/Avro RJ are the only two airliners with rear mounted air brakes because they were the only two airliners not designed with thrust reversers. It is Standard ...
Mike Sowsun's user avatar
  • 37.8k
4 votes

Do airplanes really expose their internal wires and electronics like this on the wings when braking?

Remember those lines are not exposed to the airstream; they are placed in an area that sees little moisture and pressure when the plane is moving. In flight, the flaps will have moved forward, closer ...
raubvogel's user avatar
3 votes

Can an airliner with no brakes be slowed down after landing by steering it into the grass?

Typically, you have a main braking system, an alternate one and a backup one. Then you have reversers, and runway over run. The only time i would choose grass (in an airliner) is the one at the end of ...
Mike's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

What are the differences between top and bottom mounted airbrakes?

Since airbrakes are frequently used during landing, putting them underneath the fuselage could create a ground clearance problem. Putting brakes on the top only would create a pitch-up tendency when ...
kevin's user avatar
  • 39.8k
2 votes

What prevents aircraft with a tailcone APU from using tail-mounted airbrakes?

There is no technical obstacle to building tail mounted air brakes and APU. The Fokker 70 has a tail air brake, APU and also thrust reversers and spoilers as seen in this great photo from airliners....
tieri's user avatar
  • 21

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