38

It's a safety rule to protect the limits of the airframe and the pilot. See the video (also on youtube) from this Red Bull Air Race page which explains the rules. The G-limit is discussed from 3:30. The following is a quote from the relevant section of the video. Maximum load factor, that is how much G's is the pilot pulling. That has issues [...] the ...


23

Markus Voelter interviewed Matt Hall for an episode of his omega tau podcast. They discuss this incident in more detail at 1:13:00. The aircraft experienced a high speed g stall, also called an accelerated stall. Stall is determined by the angle of attack, which is the angle of the airflow hitting the wing. Stall is most often thought of at low speed, ...


18

The 25m tall asymmetrical pylons used in Red bull air races are made of 9 different sections, which are connected with zippers for easy removal and installation. In this image, you can see the multiple sections that make up the pylon. Interior of redbull air race pylons; image from redbull air race Airgators Team Captain, Holger Leprich, who is responsible ...


14

The reduced pressure on the car not only exerts a downward force on the car, but an equal upward force on the ground. Mythbusters did an episode where they drove an Indy car over a manhole to show that it does lift the manhole cover slightly. The force on the ground is irrelevant because it doesn't move and is not attached to the car. But in your drawing ...


11

I haven't watched the video, but keep in mind that to a first order approximation, lift is perpendicular to the airfoil. In ordinary level flight or close to it, this causes the lift vector to have a significant vertical upwards component, which nicely offsets the force of gravity acting downwards on the aircraft's weight. However, if the airfoil (in this ...


9

The issue here is that ground effect requires there to be another body in which the airfoil is in close reference to (i.e. the ground). The wiki article sums it up nicely A substantial amount of downforce is available by understanding the ground to be part of the aerodynamic system in question You cant have ground effect occur inside an airfoil and ...


8

This is a fairly broad question since the races move around the world the the regulations vary heavily depending on where its occurring but ill answer for the FAA understanding that most countries treat this kind of stuff similarly. The Air race its self has its own control tower of sorts that talks directly to the pilots to clear them onto and off of the ...


7

According to their about page New pilots who wish to participate in the World Championship must first fulfil the minimum criteria set by the Red Bull Air Race Committee, which include top achievements in international flying competitions organised by the FAI. They must also be active aerobatic air display pilots. Eligible pilots that prove their skills at ...


6

The only reference I could find is here (watch the video too): Pilots keep throttle on full for racing. It is a race. Only the fastest one wins.


5

What this comes down to is that generally, wings create lift in whatever direction the top surface is facing. In normal flight, most of the force holding the airplane up is upward lift from the wings. When a plane is level, all of the lift force from the wings is directed straight up, and so the plane is able to maintain altitude. Even in an ordinary (non-...


4

From wikipedia the current structures are made up of six sections attached together by zippers and Velcro to allow quick replacement if damaged by a plane


4

No, this doesn't work: it's directly analogous to trying to fly by grabbing your shoelaces and pulling upwards. Ground effect works for the car because it increases the force between the car and the ground, over and above the car's weight. What your device would do is to increase the force between the top part of the channel and the bottom part of the ...


4

What he does is called a "G stall". Basically, he he pulled the aircraft into a harder turn (which is what he describes about 0:57 in the video). What that did was increase the centripetal force on the aircraft (measures in terms of Earth gravity, or "Gs"). This acrobatic pilot describes the effect The stall speed of an aircraft increases as the wing ...


4

It can be safety limits as discussed above or for operational prudence. One other possibility is to place limitations on the types of maneuvers which could be performed for strategy reasons ie limits to the radius of turns or vertical maneuvers for added challenge in energy management.


4

Ignoring the various practical limitations that 99.9999991% of people would encounter.... The answer more has to do with what is available than what would be optimal. There are not a whole lot of air frames that fit such a criteria and there are even fewer that are for sale to/in the public hands, when talking about things that exist in the single digit ...


3

What happened was an accelerated stall "snap roll", which Matt Hall explains at 50 seconds into the video, he "g stalled" the plane "which rolled me slightly past the knife edge", so the plane was literally slightly upside down turning downwards towards the water, as opposed to falling. An accelerated stall snap roll occurs in high g turns when one wing ...


1

Probably a MiG-21. Some flyable examples are available for between \$50,000-\$200,000, though I suspect some those airframes in an excellent condition will run upwards of \$1 million. Operational costs for MiGs tends to be surprisingly cheap, though considerably more expensive than operating exotic sports cars or other millionaire toys. At an estimate, I ...


1

In short: The mechanism on F1 is a Venturi tube. This tube and the principle of a wing have similarities between themselves, but the significant difference is the absence of downwash in the Venturi tube. Due to this absence, lift is not created. Details The car wall and the ground create a Venturi tube. In a Venturi tube air pressure is reduced where the ...


1

One of the reasons the lift is increased in the ground effect is the ram pressure, which produces an upward force on the wing/ aircraft when it is close to the ground- this works only when the aircraft is moving relative to the ground. The aircraft exerts an equal and opposite force on the ground. Now, the same force is exerted on the lower part of the ...


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