10

It seems this is a fairly new issue cropping up and I have been able to find some credible research on the topic (i.e. from official aviation authorities and not news outlets or lawyers websites...) but all of it is pretty recent. The CAA seems to be aware of the issue and has some information on it here. The two studies they link were published in 2017 so ...


6

In General, Yes. As your image already shows, the same air is distributed throughout the cabin and the flight deck. For example, in the 737 NG FCOMv2 2.30.4 (Air Systems - Air Conditioning Description) it says: Since the flight deck requires only a fraction of the air supply provided by the left pack, most of the left pack air output is mixed with the ...


5

Taking the B737 as an example, fresh air from the left pack flows directly into the cockpit (green airflow in the diagram), whereas the passenger cabin is served from the mix manifold only (yellow). Therefore pilots receive 100% fresh air while passengers receive a mix of 50% fresh air and 50% re-circulated cabin air on average, across all aircraft types ...


3

You might have been smelling cooked turbo oil. Leaking seals can potentially allow oil traces into the compressor bleed discharge, especially on auxiliary power units. The other possibility is cooked deicing fluid, which is quite common. Turbo oil and deicing fluid are the two major sources of petrochemical cabin stink. Another possibility would be an ...


2

A few years ago, the Australian Civil Aviation Safety Authority convened an Expert Panel on Aircraft Air Quality. From page 138 of the report they discuss the available monitoring devices. From my brief readthrough, there were no real monitoring devices for this purpose at the time (2009) however research was being conducted.


1

I can confirm that similar air distribution systems also exist for: Boeing 777: The flight deck receives 100% fresh conditioned air from the left pack. The flight deck is maintained at a slightly higher pressure than the passenger cabin to prevent smoke and objectionable odors from entering the flight deck. (source: 777-200 FCOMv2 2.20.3 Air Systems - ...


1

If you're smelling it on the ground, it's because there's kerosene in the air around an airport and the plane's door(s) are open. Anything on the wind will blow in. If you don't notice the smell until you're taxiing, remember that the cabin air is recycled by using outside air bled through the engine compressor stages. If you happen to be 6th in a line of ...


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