Hot answers tagged

30

ATC is, broadly speaking, required to ensure that pilots hear, understand, and acknowledge information that is delivered. The way they do that is via read-backs, and although the AIM mentions a few of the things that are required it's a good idea to read back anything that's important (If you're not sure, err on the side of "It's important"), with your ...


17

Piston aircraft require a run up, in which the pilot sets the power to a specified RPM, in order to check proper functioning of a variety of systems, and to ensure that the oil is warmed up to a specified temperature. Among the systems to be tested are carborator heat (for normally-aspirated engines), magneto operation, alternate air (for fuel-injected ...


13

This little quote from the AIM is the source of a lot of confusion for new pilots. In 4-2-3 (c), the AIM also says: c. Subsequent Contacts and Responses to Callup from a Ground Facility. You should acknowledge all callups or clearances unless the controller or FSS specialist advises otherwise. ... Acknowledge with your aircraft ...


12

Multi-part NOTAMs seem to be part of ICAO standard, as far as googling reveals. I can’t seem to find a definitive reference though. An example - and from experience a relatively reliable one - for a multi-part NOTAM is the infamous Sydney crane list, at time of writing in NOTAM H6002/18, which at the moment comes in three parts and has the part listing in ...


11

Kool-Aid is usually brightly colored due to added dye. It comes in powdered form, and you would normally add water to make a solution. If you have some in your aircraft in a suitable container (perhaps a paper bag), you can drop it on the ground during an overflight of an off-airport landing location. Hopefully the bag will burst on impact. When you return ...


9

Regardless of what the AIM says, the practical rule I've always been taught is "read back all instructions". In other words, if ATC is telling you to do something then you must read it back otherwise they have no way to know if you understood the instruction correctly and will do what they expect you to. This includes clearance, ground and airborne ...


9

I’ve been a controller in both the en route and terminal environments. While I agree with your interpretation of the AIM that it appears to be required, reorting leaving your altitude is not expected and I did not usually hear it done. To give the perspective from the other side of the mic, an altitude crossing restriction is functionally equivalent to a ...


7

It's in the AIM 5-1-1(f): When requesting a preflight briefing, identify yourself as a pilot and provide the following: Type of flight planned; e.g., VFR or IFR. Aircraft’s number or pilot’s name. Aircraft type. Departure Airport. Route of flight. Destination. Flight altitude(s). ETD and ETE Personally, I've never given or been asked for the aircraft type ...


6

Short Answer No, but you should. Long Answer I see two questions which I will answer—or attempt to answer—each in turn. Firstly, from the title: Are you required to report leaving an altitude if you have been given a crossing restriction? And secondly: If ATC gives me a clearance to cross a fix at a specific altitude or a descent at pilot's discretion ...


5

There's no definition in the AIM or regulations, as far as I know, but there is one in the P/CG, sort of (emphasis mine): HIGH SPEED TAXIWAY− A long radius taxiway designed and provided with lighting or marking to define the path of aircraft, traveling at high speed (up to 60 knots), from the runway center to a point on the center of a taxiway. Also ...


5

He was likely asking for approval to use the runway for a simulated take off without actually departing. Usually testing engine performance after modifications.


5

The issue you have appears to be that the AIM describes a case where procedures don't follow a rule (91.175) and you don't see where the authorization comes from for that deviation. What you're missing is that the approach procedures are in fact rules themselves. They just don't get published in Title 14 CFR. Standard instrument procedures are covered ...


5

Anti-collision lights are required for day and night as specified in the AIM. There's an exception to turn them off if it interferes with the pilot's visibility (e.g. while in the clouds the strobes can be distracting). This is obviously not the practice? This is the practice.


5

You have a few questions here. ...downwind pattern and I hear something like this: "123X, tower, you are #2 for runway 3, following a Cessna on final." In this case what you will do is continue your down wind leg while scanning for the Cessna traffic, some towers may ask you to "report traffic in sight" in which case you will say "traffic in sight" when ...


4

AIM 5-3-3. Additional Reports a. The following reports should be made to ATC or FSS facilities without a specific ATC request: 1. At all times. (a) When vacating any previously assigned altitude or flight level for a newly assigned altitude or flight level. Emphasis mine. The phrase 'when vacating' is pretty unambiguous. Edited answer ...


4

Not really an answer per-se, but I usually find it much easier to learn what NOT to read-back: Weather information (except QNH (altimeter settings)), like wind speed/direction, etc Time/hour/estimates (except EAT (expected approach time) when cleared to a hold) Chatter (hey, it happens! don't read it back) I can't seem to think to any others, though there ...


4

The tower controller can plan that the aircraft will be ready to line up and depart. This is important in sequencing the traffic at busy airports. If your watching a number of aircraft taxi out to the hold, its likely (dependant on the aerodrome layout) that the piston aircraft will have a number of run up checks to do, which can take a few minutes. Whilst ...


4

The AIM cannot, and does not, overrule the FARs (14 CFR). The example highlighted in the question is not an example of the AIM contradicting 14 CFR; rather this is an example of the AIM reminding pilots that the FAA retains the right to authorize certain exemptions to 14 CFR, in this case as made explicit by 14 CFR 91.175. As mins' answer accurately affirmed,...


4

The sentence before the one you bolded, with my bolding applied, says: When either the normal rate of descent or the runway alignment factor of 30 degrees (15 degrees for GPS IAPs) is exceeded, a straight-in minimum is not published and a circling minimum applies. So you can have a "circling approach" that is lined up straight in to a runway, but with ...


4

Anti collision lights are beacons and strobes. Normally, strobes are avoided when on the ground, except when taking the active. Navigation or position lights are normally not run during the day, but on larger aircraft they are, and their intensity is greater. The position lights on most planes are silvered lamps, and are quite pricey (~$40 US each when ...


3

Simplistic, but common practice... Nav (aka 'Position') lights (low power red/green/white at the extremities of the aircraft... on when the aircraft is powered, to show it's liable to do something. Anti-Collision (flashing/rotating red light, definitely on top of the aircraft, optionally also below the aircraft)... on when the engines are running, or just ...


3

From the beginning section of the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM). This manual is designed to provide the aviation community with basic flight information and ATC procedures for use in the National Airspace System (NAS) of the United States. An international version called the Aeronautical Information Publication contains parallel information, as well ...


3

If you break out of the clouds with sufficient altitude, you can line up with your desired runway of use before reaching the MAP. You can only do this if you can effect the landing using normal maneuvering procedures. Breaking out of the clouds before the FAF with 10sm or more visibility would be a perfect scenario to deviate from the lateral guidance and ...


2

In the aeronautical information manual (AIM) itself: This publication, while not regulatory, provides information which reflects examples of operating techniques and procedures which may be requirements in other federal publications or regulations. It is made available solely to assist pilots in executing their responsibilities required by other ...


1

I think there is some term jumbling here that can likely be cleared up with the statement: Circling minimums do not necessarily imply you are going to execute a "circle-to-land" maneuver A circle-to-land maneuver is a low altitude, close to the field, turning maneuver that allows you to use an approach set up for a given runway but ultimately ...


1

Taking a "High Speed Taxi" refers to using a specific taxiway designed to exit the runway at a high speed after landing. The term does NOT refer to using ANY taxiway at a high speed. Larger busier class D, C, and B airports have these highspeed taxiways. An example of this is Taxiway Hotel at Van Nuys off of 16R. Thus the pilot you mentioned was requesting "...


1

The FAA does not provide a taxi speed limit but most airlines require observance of SOP "standard operating procedures" as part of their certification process. Normal SOP's are 30kts max with 10kts preferred. The rule I have seen for most flight training schools is "no more than a fast walk". While not specific to the FAA's FAR or AIM, this FAA video ...


1

If you look a page or two earlier in the AIM in section 7-1-5(b) the FAA gives two examples: b. Standard Briefing. You should request a Standard Briefing any time you are planning a flight and you have not received a previous briefing or have not received preliminary information through mass dissemination media; for example, TIBS, TWEB (Alaska only), ...


1

I am Australian, but I can't see why these procedures would differ greatly between our countries. The answer to your first question is no. In the absence of airport-specific published procedures, you do not need to wait for tower clearance to turn base, however you must tell them that you are commencing the turn. Usually once you tell them that you're ...


1

In the US... Under radar contact the leaving level phraseology is not expected nor needed by ATC. What they do need is you tell them what altitude you are at (plus climbing/descend to) when you check in. The leaving level is mandatory when flying without radar contact. But AIM tells us to do it anyways. I listened in nearly 100 hours of recent flying (...


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