15

They were tested in 1935. Since ailerons are thin (thickness-to-chord ratio), they were placed in a leading edge slot, and it was dubbed slot-lip aileron. The study's conclusion is: The slot-lip ailerons appear to be usable as a form of lateral control device that shows promise of giving improved lateral control and stability at the high angles of attack ...


10

Truly leading edge ailerons would not work. It is mainly the orientation of the trailing edge that determines the direction in which the air flow continues behind the wing and therefore the lift. The forward part of the wing is there mainly to turn the air flow gently so it stays attached to the surface. If you have a leading edge flap, and deflect it ...


8

There are two coefficients which determine the forces needed to deflect a control surface (besides the physical parameters like area and dynamic pressure): Change in control surface hinge moment coefficient $c_r$ with angle of attack $\alpha$ : $c_{r\alpha}=\frac{\delta c_r}{\delta\alpha}$ Change in control surface hinge moment coefficient $c_r$ with ...


7

The normal flight law behaves as if it auto-trims the aileron, but there is no actual trim involved. The computer simply derives the desired deflection of ailerons using the pilot input and feedback from the inertial reference system. So In normal law (which requires working inertial reference) neutral side-stick means maintain bank angle, so effectively ...


7

There is no need for aileron trim because the flight control system keeps the bank angle constant if there is no lateral input on the side stick. The pilots use the side stick to roll the aircraft to the desired bank angle and then hold the stick neutral. The FCS will then maintain that bank angle by giving the right amount of aileron input. The exception is ...


7

The tabs themselves are not locked -- that lock you mention is upstream: an input lock. Next time you sit next to the wing, watch the aileron as the pilots check the controls and notice how the tab moves opposite (alternatively, and rewindable, you can watch it here). With the input locked, the tabs are free to move without directly feeding back into the ...


6

JW Dunne briefly tried leading-edge elevators on the D.3 glider at Blair Atholl in 1908. His aircraft had tailless swept wings. The elevator flaps were triangular shaped and fitted at the nose. They just blew back over the wing in flight, and he gave up on the idea. (The first certified stable aeroplane, the D.5, was of similar design and flew in 1910, and ...


6

I have seen photos of a hang glider that was modified to have spoilers (or "spoilerons")1 on the top surface of the wing for better roll response. The spoilers were controlled by sliders on the control bar, and both could be opened at once for extra drag to increase the descent rate. The spoilers were hinged at their leading edges, like typical ...


5

This will become a long answer again. The most important benefit of an internally sealed aileron is reduced control forces. Ailerons require lots of attention to keep forces small while still avoiding a negative force gradient (that is when the aileron runs into its stops all by itself). In most manually controlled airplanes the ailerons become stiff as a ...


5

Specifically, the simulation suggests to me that a flying wing (or any tailless aircraft) with two single elevons along the whole of the two trailing edges is not controllable. This is certainly not true. Many radio-controlled model airplanes and gliders with an all-wing, chevron-shaped configuration and no tail have this exact configuration of the elevons,...


4

This shows the chordwise pressure distribution of a typical airfoil with a slotted flap retracted, at 10, 20 and 30deg, at both constant lift and at constant angle of attack. Deploying flaps changes the lift distribution across the entire chord of the wing. Ailerons have the same effect.


3

Disclaimer: I can only speculate, having no direct involvement with the development of the Curtiss Model F. Stick forces were not really an issue with the small and slow early aeroplanes. As both size and speed went up, they would become a design consideration first because the pilot strength is lowest for lateral motion of the stick or control horn. With ...


2

Twelve radians is nearly two full turns -- per second! I've got a couple hundred hours of stick time in R/C, ranging from two-channel sailplanes to four-channel mildly aerobatic sport models. The most aerobatic models I ever had, a Swizzle Stick and a Terrier, had a lower roll rate than you propose; few pattern aerobatic models have higher (maybe a Zlin or ...


2

I’m a bit rusty on my aerodynamic theory but having flown the Avro Vulcan B2 for several years I can assure the that a delta wing with elevons works very well! The only slightly unconventional handling trait was the ‘flap effect’ if you pushed the stick forward on finals and suddenly got a bit of extra lift!


2

Because the horn extends ahead of the hinge line, the slipstream tends to pull the rudder deeper into deflection. This reduces the amount of control force needed to work the rudder without servo-boosting it. This is called aerodynamic boost and can be used to boost the ailerons and the elevator as well.


2

The key factor is the airflow through the gap in front of the aileron itself. This gap increases the maximum lift coefficient (and thus effectiveness) of the aileron by introducing high-energy airflow from the pressure side to the suction side of the wing, thereby delaying separation. Without the gap, the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side would ...


1

Airplanes are designed with less lateral stability when compared to longitudinal stability and directional stability. This means, they are very nimble and easy to control in the roll axis. If you have flown any aircraft you will realise that it is way easier to roll an aircraft than pitch it up and down. A longitudinally unstable aircraft can easily go out ...


1

Interplane-strut mountings would offer multiple benefits: Aerodynamic stability (it would reduce the chances of structural failure) Structural stability (to put it simply, it would make the plane stronger) reduce wing flex (it would greatly reduce the flexing of the wing caused by strong forces of, well, air) render ailerons more useful (Interplane-strut ...


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