32 votes

What is a skidding turn (vs slipping turn)?

The terms "slip" and "skid" refer to two different types of uncoordinated turn - neither has much to do with the elevator, instead both depend on what the rudder is doing: Skids In a skid you have ...
voretaq7's user avatar
  • 68.4k
28 votes

Why does aileron response diminish as speed becomes slower, from slow-flight up to the stall? (In a light trainer)

This is real easy, no explanation required: Tell your student to stick their hand out the window of the car driving 25mph in the city and rotate it like an aileron. Then have them do it on the freeway ...
Michael Hall's user avatar
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21 votes
Accepted

Why would the front edge of an aileron fold outward?

That is an enclosure for a counterweight, either made from steel or lead to balance the aileron and/or reduce control flutter in various flight regimes. The extension provides an additional lever arm ...
Romeo_4808N's user avatar
  • 73.7k
19 votes

Do the A380 ailerons act as air brakes on landing?

Yes the ailerons deflect upwards after main wheel touchdown to dump as much lift as possible: they work as lift dumpers, together with the spoilers which are deployed first. Source: an A380 pilot ...
Koyovis's user avatar
  • 61.7k
16 votes

What would an all-flying aileron look like, and would it be a good idea?

The word aileron specifically refers to a part of the airplane, usually, but not always, connected to the back edge of the wing, that is used to control roll and to turn the aircraft when used in ...
Aaron Holmes's user avatar
  • 4,847
15 votes
Accepted

What is an aileron bushing?

Bushings are a type of bearing that has no rotating parts. They are among the oldest bearings known. There is nothing special about it being for ailerons, except that is will be installed on the ...
Federico's user avatar
  • 32.6k
15 votes
Accepted

How does an aileron actuator work considering the following?

You will see two methods of providing articulation for the hydraulic cylinder to accommodate the vertical shift of the attachment at the aileron as the aileron moves. In one method, one end of the ...
John K's user avatar
  • 131k
14 votes

Can all airliners be turned without rudder input?

It depends on the aspect ratio of the wing and the lift coefficient. Short, stubby wings at low angle of attack will not create much adverse yaw with aileron input, especially when the ailerons have ...
Peter Kämpf's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Why is using opposite rudder and aileron necessary in left turn for coordination?

First and foremost you should always be looking at the turn coordinator to see what is going on and applying rudder as necessary. In your specific case (if we want to discuss the physics), basically ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 101k
12 votes

Do the A380 ailerons act as air brakes on landing?

The ailerons, along with the spoilers are configured to act as lift dumpers on touchdown in most of the newer Airbus aircraft. This was introduced in the Elevator Aileron Computer ELAC standard L96, ...
aeroalias's user avatar
  • 100k
11 votes

Why is using opposite rudder and aileron necessary in left turn for coordination?

You should just look at the ball and that will remove all doubt. If the ball is to the left, you use left rudder. It's that simple. After a while, like a couple hundred hours, you will start to feel ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 13.3k
11 votes

Is a monobloc variable incidence wing viable (updated)?

Yes it is a viable way for roll control - aerodynamically that is. The mechanism you describe is a proper servo tab, where the aeroforces on the tab are fed back, and the tab acts like a lever on the ...
Koyovis's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

Can an aileron stall in-flight?

The aileron itself doesn't stall, being part of the main wing. But since it alters the camber of the main wing it changes the local angle of attack in effect. On older airplanes, a down aileron at ...
John K's user avatar
  • 131k
11 votes

What is the difference between an aileron and a flap?

An Aileron is used to control the roll of an aircraft. Ailerons are found on the trailing edge of the wing, typically closer to the wing tip. Ailerons will move in opposite directions to each other, ...
scotty3785's user avatar
11 votes

What would an all-flying aileron look like, and would it be a good idea?

Most early ailerons were all-flying surfaces fitted between the wing tips. Examples include the 1906 Santos-Dumont 14.bis, the first plane to fly in Europe, S.F. Cody's 1908 British Army Aeroplane No....
Guy Inchbald's user avatar
  • 7,042
10 votes

Why is using opposite rudder and aileron necessary in left turn for coordination?

There are already good answers, so I won't dwell on the standard advice to look at the slip indicator and do the necessary, but I'll answer to clear up a possible misunderstanding. You do not use ...
Dan Hulme's user avatar
  • 12.7k
10 votes

Can all airliners be turned without rudder input?

For most aircraft, it is. Deflecting ailerons only results in adverse yaw: the aileron deflecting downwards has higher drag than the one deflecting upwards, and the nose turns away from the direction ...
Koyovis's user avatar
  • 61.7k
10 votes
Accepted

Are there roll control devices other than ailerons?

Yes, that will work. If the entire wing tip pivots, it simply acts as an aileron that takes up the entire chord of the wing. Other alternatives to ailerons include: Weight shifting. If you can shift ...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
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10 votes
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What are some common aileron failures?

When talking about that sort of thing, you're really looking for single-point-of-failure weak links that are difficult to detect during a walkaround or inspection. Hinges don't normally just let go ...
John K's user avatar
  • 131k
10 votes
Accepted

Why doesn’t the A320 have any provision for manual aileron trim?

The normal flight law behaves as if it auto-trims the aileron, but there is no actual trim involved. The computer simply derives the desired deflection of ailerons using the pilot input and feedback ...
Jan Hudec's user avatar
  • 56.3k
10 votes

Were leading edge ailerons tested?

Truly leading edge ailerons would not work. It is mainly the orientation of the trailing edge that determines the direction in which the air flow continues behind the wing and therefore the lift. The ...
Jan Hudec's user avatar
  • 56.3k
9 votes
Accepted

What is the purpose of this aileron trailing edge strip?

Mr. Tom Clements—the Tom Clements—told me the following in answer to my inquiries on this matter.1 While I cannot yet offer any documentation on this in the form of a Beechcraft publication, this ...
J W's user avatar
  • 16.6k
9 votes
Accepted

The F/A-18 Hornet , F15 and MiG-29 ailerons from the external parts of the wings go up some degrees in flight ,meaning adding " crow" .Why?

The pictures in the question show the normal position of the MiG-29 ailerons. That's how they are unless a roll is commanded. According to Mikoyan Mig-29 Fulcrum Pilot's Flight Operating Manual (...
Jpe61's user avatar
  • 28.8k
9 votes
Accepted

Elevator or Aileron?

Wikipedia has a useful page on flight control surfaces, which includes this image: (Credit: Wikimedia Commons) The item labeled inboard flap may be the items you are asking about. From that page: ...
Dave Gremlin's user avatar
  • 2,730
8 votes

Are the functions of ailerons and rudder similar?

I would add one small addition to the adverse yaw issue: some aircraft (notably older airplanes, pre-1950, e.g., and sailplanes) require rudder to effect a turn. They develop so much adverse yaw that ...
ammPilot's user avatar
  • 516
8 votes
Accepted

When is aileron trim used?

Given your request to "answer with less smart words," it's hard to know what knowledge can be assumed, but I'll give it a try. Let's say you're hand-flying the airplane straight and level, and you ...
Terry's user avatar
  • 39.1k

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