7 votes

Would mid-air refueling for an air-to-space vehicle that flies like a plane be a viable advantage if the tech was available?

As you've already learned from the comments, the hard part of getting to space isn't the height, it's the speed. The Saturn V broke the sound barrier less than 30 seconds after launch. So, how is your ...
HiddenWindshield's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How does one specialize in a certain sub-field of aerospace engineering?

I'm going to speak for a North American post-secondary experience. The simple answer is, you don't get to specialize in any particular domain within aerospace engineering as an undergraduate, even if ...
JZYL's user avatar
  • 11.1k
6 votes
Accepted

How are flaps and the elevator positioned in cruise?

Wing flaps are used to significantly change the wing (size/shape/aerodynamics) so that it flies better at the slower speeds associated with taking off & landing. With rare exceptions (fly-by-wire ...
Ralph J's user avatar
  • 51.4k
5 votes

How to convert aircraft position from GPS to Local Tangent Plane (NED) coordinates?

If I understand it correctly, you would like to calculate the position of the aircraft in a North East Down (NED) reference frame. The origin of that reference frame is at the reference location. The ...
DeltaLima's user avatar
  • 83.4k
5 votes

How exactly is cruise maintained as fuel is burnt?

AS the plane burns fuel, it gets lighter, lift exceeds weight, and the plane climbs a little. The autopilot notices the climb, and trims the plane a little nose-down to decrease the AoA and hence the ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
4 votes

How exactly is cruise maintained as fuel is burnt?

Well, ”exactly” is a bit broad concept, but the basic idea is rather simple. Four main forces affect the aircraft in flight. Gravity has to be compensated by lift and drag by engine thrust. When the ...
busdriver's user avatar
  • 3,340
3 votes

Change of absolute ceiling with weight

Short answer: The new aerodynamic ceiling is 40,000 ft density altitude. Constant Temperature Condition It is instructive to imagine the following scenario: The aircraft is flying at the coffin ...
Aditya Sharma's user avatar
2 votes

Is it possible to work for free in Aerospace Industry for experiences

Sure you can. What you're looking for is called an internship, and they're hardly limited to just IT work. Since most internships are targeted specifically at students looking for experience, they're ...
HiddenWindshield's user avatar
2 votes

why lift coefficient decreases at supersonic flow?

As you probably know already, the 2D lift curve slope in supersonic flow is $$C_{L\alpha} = \frac{4\cdot\alpha}{\sqrt{Ma^2 - 1}}$$ when calculated by potential flow theory. But I guess you would like ...
Peter Kämpf's user avatar
1 vote

Why is the wave drag of a straight wing less than that of a swept back wing?

First, you should always provide a citation when you say something like "According to NASA's claims". It will provide the context that we can make sure we are answering the right question. ...
Rob McDonald's user avatar
  • 11.1k
1 vote
Accepted

How exactly is cruise maintained as fuel is burnt?

An airplane in level flight can begin to climb by raising its elevator. The air hitting the elevator causes the nose of the plane to rise, presenting more of its wing to oncoming air. This increases ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 15.5k
1 vote
Accepted

When doing calculations with TSFC of multiple engines, do we add all TSFCs together?

The thrust-specific fuel consumption (TSFC) is a measure of how efficient an engine is. It tells you what fuel flow rate is required to generate a certain amount of thrust. If you have two engines, ...
Bianfable's user avatar
  • 55.9k
1 vote

why lift coefficient decreases at supersonic flow?

Let's consider a flat plate and let it fly both at subsonic and at supersonic speeds. Let's start with the subsonic case and let's see how the airflow looks like around the flat plate (picture source)...
sophit's user avatar
  • 11.9k
1 vote
Accepted

effect of wing chord length on lift coefficient

We know the definition of the aircraft lift coefficient in steady flight: $$C_L=\frac{W}{\frac{1}{2}\rho V^2 \cdot S}$$ We can now divide the entire wing (with area $S$) in tiny slices of area $dS$, ...
ROIMaison's user avatar
  • 7,157
1 vote

Could the Wright Flyer II takeoff without wind?

The Wright Flyer II, at 15 hp, was underpowered, but still able to fly a full circle by the end of the 1904 season, in spite of several crashes$^2$. Lengthening the rail (with a lot of grease) may ...
Robert DiGiovanni's user avatar
1 vote

Relation between lift force and torque produced in propeller used for vertical take-off and landing aircrafts

What you are looking for is Blade Element Theory: The expression for the torque of the whole propeller is therefore $$ Q = \frac{1}{2} \rho V^2 B \int_0^RQ_c \, dr $$ Q - total torque required by ...
MishaP's user avatar
  • 805
1 vote
Accepted

What are "secondary precessional forces" that apply to boomerangs in flight?

The aerodynamic forces on the boomerang are roughly like the springs that limit the (primary) precession of a rate gyroscope. These forces introduce a secondary torque, which in turn produces the ...
Camille Goudeseune's user avatar

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