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4 votes

Why does the shock angle always seem to equal the "sound cone" angle?

Close to the body, the shock wave has an angle given by the oblique shock formula. Far from the body, the shock wave has an angle given by the mach cone formula. At the transition, the shock cone ...
QuadmasterXLII's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Engineless Blimp Navigation System

Yes, this gets into the question of off-board versus on-board far-field air data sensing capabilities. With regards to the latter, lidar systems have been studied. Alas, ttbomk, no practical, ...
AeroAndy's user avatar
2 votes

Angle of bank affects on descent rate

Yes, of course. It's the square root of 1 over cosine bank angle × airspeed. That will determine speed increase required to glide while banked, but ... Turn radius favors lower airspeed. You want to ...
Robert DiGiovanni's user avatar
1 vote

Lift without aerofoil?

When we study the lift produced by an airfoil, we add together the lift caused by the camber (the curved mean surface of the airfoil) and the lift caused by the angle of attack. Any symmetrical ...
Rob McDonald's user avatar
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1 vote

Why does the angle of a shock change when the flow leaves the influence area of an object?

It seems we have 2 phenomena at work here, air being moved by the energy of the moving object and an energy pulse being transmitted by the air: the sound wave. At the leading edge interface the (...
Robert DiGiovanni's user avatar
1 vote

Why does the shock angle always seem to equal the "sound cone" angle?

Here's another diagram of the equations and terminology in sophit's answer. (This isn't a proper answer as such.)
Camille Goudeseune's user avatar

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