27

It doesn't only use biplanes, searching "wingwalking monoplane" provides these examples, of some low wing monoplane and high wing monoplane. Whatever the aircraft, it has to be able to fly slowly. (source) (not 100% about this one but it looks like one Klemm aircraft) (source) (Here one quite rare danish SAI KZ III equipped with a hatch behind the wing, ...


19

3 reasons: The really obvious one; biplanes had the interplane structural network to hang on to when doing the wing walking. It's a heck of a lot safer for the wing walker. Even today, most of the wing walker acts use Stearman or Waco biplanes. They generally have lower wing loadings than comparable monoplanes so could fly slower. They were readily ...


6

The maneuvers listed are not really extreme, and it is certain that, catering for the general public, they will be accomplished at a relatively high altitude. The airplane is widely used in the aerobatic field and is generally regarded as reliable. Therefore I believe that there is no more danger than there would be if you were doing a regular flying lesson. ...


4

A Barrel Roll is a maneuver where the aircraft flight path follows what would be the surface of a huge horizontal barrel in the sky. To do this you of course need to roll the aircraft. To roll the Phantom, no matter what maneuver you are attempting, requires that you create differential lift on the wings. (more lift on the up-moving wing than on the down-...


3

Can more than one of these things be true at the same time? Yes. It is only a matter of the point of view, or, more precisely, the reference system. Consider a trivial case first: The aircraft sits on the ground, engine off. The pilot will feel his weight pressing into the seat even in the absence of aerodynamic forces. What he feels is gravity, and the ...


2

It's the acceleration of the object laterally due to a change from a straight path to a curved one. You're just along for the ride. If you are spinning a ball around on a string on a vertical plane, I think you could look at it as the lift vector being the string. As the ball passes the bottom of the arc, you have centrifugal force (the ball being forced ...


2

For example for the Patrouille de France under the Alpha Jet there is a tank called the smoke pod. Inside, two tanks contain oil with a colorant if you want color, or without colorant if you want white. When the pilot opens one of the valves, the oil flows through a small pipe and exits only at the left reactor. With the heat, around 700°C, it immediately ...


2

Yes. This video at 0:50 shows a heli climbing into a loop, labeled at the top as 1.4 G and 25 knots, so it's still in forward flight when it reaches inverted flight. The view from inside the cabin at 0:58 confirms pitching without rolling. (At 1:26 the heli does what's labeled as a front flip at low G's, but that includes a lot of roll too.) The pilot is ...


2

Yes it is possible. It happen in a Brazilian plane hijack in September 1988 on flight VSP375 from Vasp flight company. . The plane was a Boeing 737-317 (# 23176, serial #Boeing 1213, Brazilian register PP-SNT). The hijacker wanted to throw the plane on Brazilian president official home , the pilot tried the maneuver and succeed with 105 passengers onboard.


2

The sum of inertial forces in the body frame of the aircraft is equal magnitude and opposite direction of the sum of all external (which for aircraft means aerodynamic forces and thrust) forces acting on the aircraft. Per second law of motion, $a = \frac{F}{m}$. Since the aircraft is not accelerating in a reference frame attached to itself, the external and ...


2

The answer lies in a breakdown of the term aerodynamic. It may be obvious, but I will say it anyway: "Aero" is the Latin word for air. So is it possible for the human body to perceive an aerodynamic force? Absolutely. Leaning into a gale force wind, sticking your hand out the car window, skydiving, even the sensation of a light breeze across your face ...


2

I'd offer that it's due to the speed of the plane. I have seen it done with mono-wing planes as well, but it's rare, as others have also mentioned. The rationale for biplanes is likely twofold: There's a nostalgia element to be considered, now that the style of plane is out of fashion, and has been for some time. Two wings means more aerodynamic lift. The ...


1

They are 3 different ways to roll an airplane: First the barrel roll during which the airplane is flying normally, you are keeping positive g rate and using ailerons to induce the roll. The trajectory is making a wide spiral and you use rudder input to keep the symmetry of the flight. Second the aileron roll, where the aircraft continues in a straight line ...


1

Again, my inner lawyer comes out, and I would have to say well it depends. Aerobatic flights like the ones listed there are going to be done with a competent aerobatic pilot at the controls in an airplane specifically designed and certified in the aerobatic category. This environment is also going to be further enhanced by flying at higher altitudes as ...


1

The only forces felt by a pilot are the aerodynamic forces from the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the aircraft, and the thrust of the engines. Contrary to generally accepted concepts, Gravity is not a “force”. It is just an artificial construct we use to make the Math work out because we are generally measuring the motion of things (like an ...


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