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5

That depends on regulations but broadly speaking it is ultimately always the Pilot In Commands responsibility to make sure all instruments are functioning properly. § 91.3 Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command. (a) The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of ...


1

It is wise that controllers alert even when the pilot has not declared an emergency. They have to be prepared and start coordination and assessment of the situation because one situation that is not emergent in the air can turn quickly to a distress one. This does not mean that controllers have to block the frequency and ask every moment. The controllers ...


6

At night, at that range, it will look about like a dot of light, probably with a red flashing beacon and white flashing strobe lights. That's what you'll see from essentially every aircraft at that range at night, unless the pilot chooses to turn off some or all lights. But you're seeing the LIGHTS, not the AIRCRAFT, at that distance, and the ability to ...


9

tl;dr We don't know. The US Government has not made enough information available to answer this question. The official Iranian and US reports contradict each other. Inofficial accounts of sailors on other USN vessels operating in the vicinity at the same time contradict both the official US report as well as statements made by Vincennes commanding officer. ...


6

The NTSB will investigate every aircraft accident in the US, and any that foreign authorities delegate to them. As you found, there thousands of accidents ever year. Most of these are not fatal. The NTSB will at least gather the factual information and do their best to arrive at a probable cause. With limited resources, the NTSB must decide which accidents ...


2

Sounds similar to the De Havilland Comet 1's other problem. On 26 October 1952, the Comet suffered its first hull loss when a BOAC flight departing Rome's Ciampino airport failed to become airborne and ran into rough ground at the end of the runway. ... Both early accidents were originally attributed to pilot error, as over-rotation had led ...


2

There are a couple I can think of off-hand from the last couple of decades (in addition to the ones already listed in other answers): 1. National Airlines Flight 102 I suppose whether this one counts depends on exactly what definition of "airliner" you're using. Certainly, the 747-400 is normally considered an airliner, though this was its cargo variant. I ...


1

The 1972 crash of BEA flight 548 in Staines, near Heathrow Airport, London, was, and remains, the most lethal flying accident (excluding terrorism) in the UK. It was a significant incident with respect to raising issues of crisis management in the cockpit, and in bringing about the use of cockpit voice recorders. The proximate cause was a decrease in the ...


4

Two other catastrophic accidents during takeoff phase occurred on flight testing for transport category aircraft, though both of them are business jets: 1. Bombardier Challenger 604, 2000, Wichita Aggressive takeoff rotation led to fuel migration and shifted the aircraft CG aft of the allowed limits. The combined effect of the large initial rate of ...


3

Several examples on Skybrary One of the most notorious cases is arguably Northwest's MD-82 On 16 August 1987, an MD-82 being operated by Northwest Airlines on a scheduled passenger flight from Detroit MI to Phoenix AZ failed to get properly airborne in day VMC and, after damaging impact with obstacles within the airport perimeter after climbing to ...


13

There are two fairly recent airliner crashes I can think of that were the direct result of an aerodynamic stall, one is Air France 447 and the other is Colgan Air 3407. AF447 was at cruise height when the incident began, so that one does not fit with your question. Colgan3407 was landing, so was pretty much "low level" (Does "jet" permit a turboprop?). ...


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