30

Yes learn both, but... not at the same time. As Dave says, there are too many differences to be absorbing simultaneously. It's like a new airline pilot taking a type course on a Dash 8 and an RJ at the same time. It'll burn you out. If all this is a hobby activity in the first place with no urgent time lines, drop the power training for now and go take a ...


25

Cloud, you are making a huge inference from a few small data points. But in any case, to the basic question, which is actually a very good one: In terms of the chance of getting killed, (what you seem to be looking for), maybe, marginally, but not enough to rule out operating from grass. If you know what you are doing, and make allowances, I would say ...


14

First of all, Ryanair has more than 700,000 flights per year now, but not during their entire 35 year existence. The total number of flights you give is therefore too high. Assuming aircraft accidents are purely statistical (which is not true, of course), one can estimate the number of accidents you expect using a Poisson distribution: the probability of ...


13

There are two fairly recent airliner crashes I can think of that were the direct result of an aerodynamic stall, one is Air France 447 and the other is Colgan Air 3407. AF447 was at cruise height when the incident began, so that one does not fit with your question. Colgan3407 was landing, so was pretty much "low level" (Does "jet" permit a turboprop?). ...


10

Intentionally with a large aircraft, yes. There was however an instance in 1945, where a B-25 Mitchell collided with the Empire State building. This however was an accident. There have been several suicides by airplane where the aircraft was deliberately crashed into buildings, such as the C172 which was crashed into a Tampa FL high rise in 2002 or the ...


10

It is unreasonable to assume that a busier airport has a higher rate of fatalities compared to a smaller airport. There is just no logical reason to think so. The total number of fatalities may well be higher simply because there is a larger number of flights, but I know that is not what you are asking. You might think that busier airports would have more ...


7

I'd argue fall and spring bring more unpredictable weather, and slippery runways are year-round in the tropics. That being said, for all jet (commercial) accidents, the weather-related contributing threats are: Meteorology (e.g., failure to identify threats before a flight) 30% Windy conditions 16% Poor visibility 10% Thunderstorms 9% Icing 1% Poor ...


7

Each time you interpret statistical values, you need to look at both, the mean value and the mean deviation. The mean value of incidents per flight per year gives you the expectation value. That would be the 2 to 3 that you cited. Now you have to look at the distribution. Many statistics are shaped like the famous Gauss bell. The statistic of accidents per ...


7

John K already gave a great answer about the runway surface itself and there are some other points that might be worth mentioning too. Grass runways are often uncontrolled, short, rough, obstructed, and generally different from paved ones. That's a big generalization, of course, but it's worth thinking about the wider runway environment. Uncontrolled. ...


6

I participated in a tiny supporting role in a few crash investigations involving CRJs, so I'll give it a shot, and I would say that when a main cause is listed, especially for something mechanical, it's what you might call a "primary trigger", without which, follow-on supporting factors and events that led to the crash would never have occurred. Or an ...


5

The plane was flown into the ground with a clearly visible and well-known landing error, pitching down after a bounce. That said, to blame it squarely on the pilots is premature, especially as the crew will soon be able to shed light on what happened. I've done some of the same in simulators with heavy instrument failures, although their poor/lacking damage ...


4

No, this is not a good way of understanding safety in aviation. The figures you have may be accurate, but they are not figures describing the same things. You have figures describing fatalities per 100'000 hours, 100'000 flights, and per year. In order to establish relative risk, you first must settle upon a common metric for each of these ways of flying, ...


4

No it will make it more dangerous. Gliders and powered aircraft have different flight characteristics. You will have learn how to handle two completely different machines. You will have to develop muscle memory for two different types of aircraft. The flight procedures for the two types of aircraft are completely different, different approach profiles etc....


4

Two other catastrophic accidents during takeoff phase occurred on flight testing for transport category aircraft, though both of them are business jets: 1. Bombardier Challenger 604, 2000, Wichita Aggressive takeoff rotation led to fuel migration and shifted the aircraft CG aft of the allowed limits. The combined effect of the large initial rate of ...


3

Several examples on Skybrary One of the most notorious cases is arguably Northwest's MD-82 On 16 August 1987, an MD-82 being operated by Northwest Airlines on a scheduled passenger flight from Detroit MI to Phoenix AZ failed to get properly airborne in day VMC and, after damaging impact with obstacles within the airport perimeter after climbing to ...


3

Ill second Camille's answer and add the missing factor of GA vs. Commercial Aviation. The NTSB makes the 2012-2016 data available in spreadsheet format here. If you download that and combine all the accident data you will see that the overall accident data for those years, plotted by month looks something like this: This data set for even the limited years ...


3

Accidents are rarest in winter. In https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/index.aspx, click "Download all (text)", to get a file AviationData.txt containing 80,000 accidents and 4,000 incidents. Keep only the Accidents, split the |-delimited fields to get mm/dd/yyyy, then split by / to get the month, then count how often each month appears. From a ...


2

Does anybody have numbers of fatal crashes pr. million flights, or similar? Not that I can find. Too little data? In terms of airline passenger miles, the SSJ100 seems to account for a tiny proportion of passenger miles in Russia. Non russian airlines have eliminated or scaled-back use of the SSJ100 According to Time Mexico’s Interjet said Sunday it ...


2

As the wonderful Aviation After-Dinner speaker David Gunson used to say, "You should always sit at the back as no aircraft had yet been known to reverse into a mountain." This was, of course, before the Osprey made it a possibility.


2

I want to add one more thing that neither existing answer discusses, but which I feel is relevant here. Grass strips are more difficult than hardened ones to spot from the air, especially if you're not used to them and know exactly what to look for. This doesn't make them more dangerous per se (as a pilot, you should only continue the landing if doing so ...


2

Sounds similar to the De Havilland Comet 1's other problem. On 26 October 1952, the Comet suffered its first hull loss when a BOAC flight departing Rome's Ciampino airport failed to become airborne and ran into rough ground at the end of the runway. ... Both early accidents were originally attributed to pilot error, as over-rotation had led ...


2

There are a couple I can think of off-hand from the last couple of decades (in addition to the ones already listed in other answers): 1. National Airlines Flight 102 I suppose whether this one counts depends on exactly what definition of "airliner" you're using. Certainly, the 747-400 is normally considered an airliner, though this was its cargo variant. I ...


1

You wont find a single source for any of these things but you can find some of the info form fairly reliable sources: The NTSB publishes accident data by type and year but this is only for US accidents or accidents involving US aircraft that they can investigate overseas. The FAA allows you to lookup by make and model and would allow to get some info on ...


1

The 1972 crash of BEA flight 548 in Staines, near Heathrow Airport, London, was, and remains, the most lethal flying accident (excluding terrorism) in the UK. It was a significant incident with respect to raising issues of crisis management in the cockpit, and in bringing about the use of cockpit voice recorders. The proximate cause was a decrease in the ...


1

For assessing GA safety (in all categories really, down to paramotors), you have to evaluate things from the standpoint of a non-idiot pilot, not just the raw statistical numbers, because the raw numbers are totally polluted by stupidity. If you filtered out GA accidents caused by pilots doing stupid things; running out of gas, running into weather, ...


1

You seem to list the fatal accident numbers in the correct descending order, while leaving out a number for commercial flying. "General Aviation (learning or as a passenger in a Cessna and the like)" General aviation covers much more than your simplfied comment as noted in the FAA link you provided for a 2017 Nall Report covering data from 2015, while only ...


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