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0

The Cessna my father and brother were killed in crashed in in-accessible dense woods in Maine. The wreckage was never officially salvaged or removed.


17

In 2017 an MD-83 aborted takeoff above V1. The pilot was widely criticized for that, which was against a lot of rules and conventional wisdom. The NTSB report determined that aborting above V1 was the most correct thing to do in this case. https://www.planeandpilotmag.com/article/ntsb-report-how-this-pilot-saved-116-lives/#.XkzGlopOmhA


4

I will note that in maritime law there is the General Prudential Rule which states that avoiding a collision takes precedence over strict adherence to other rules and regulations. I would have to believe that there are similar provisions in aviation rules.


23

As pointed out above pilots may deviate from any regulation in the event of an emergency per §91.3(b). One of the more common events is a civilian aircraft making an emergency diversion and landing at a nearby military airbase, such as this 777 flight which diverted to Erickson AB, Shemaya, AK. The OP brings up the case of Cactus 1549. But what Sully and ...


8

There have been cases with incorrectly wired controls, with the aircraft doing the opposite action than such a wrongly wired control commands. Then the narrow rules about how to use the control to achieve intended action must be completely reversed, moving the stick in the opposite direction. Doing so does not break the wider rules that cover such ...


33

First I have to admit that I have no idea what FAA regulations said about passengers taking part in controlling an airplane in 1989, but I guess it was at least frowned upon, even if the passenger happened to be a pilot. The United Airlines flight 232 made a stunningly successful "landing" at Sioux City airport, much due to the fact that they took an extra ...


28

The rules say to do whatever necessary to ensure safety of flight. 91.3 Responsibility and authority of the pilot in command. (a) The pilot in command of an aircraft is directly responsible for, and is the final authority as to, the operation of that aircraft. (b) In an in-flight emergency requiring immediate action, the pilot in command may deviate ...


5

The OEM will have its own Product Safety organization, staffed with investigators and analysts, that participates and supports accident investigations with its own internal contingency budget. So when a crash happens, a team is formed with the Regulator (FAA), the Gov't Investigator (NSTB), investigators or representatives from the OEM, and investigators or ...


14

In the United States, no, the airline does not pay the NTSB or the FAA for accident investigations. This is considered a public service and is paid for by tax funds. That doesn't necessarily mean that they won't pay for anything. For example if the NTSB has to remove wreckage to examine it, they will often have the insurance company pay for the removal and ...


1

In the U.S. an airport will have safety teams and internal incident/accident reporting. This is more for airport operations and OSHA standards. It has little to nothing to do with what we typically think of FAA/NTSB incident and accident reporting and investigation. The airport’s team is strictly internal. Although, it may have to report to some external ...


2

More often than not, the accident investigation boards in Europe are a governmental unit independent of NCAA. The Board should be able to criticize and put requirements on all units involved in an accident/incident. This obviously include the CAA. Departements and organizations are free to do an accident investigation. Availability to an accident site may ...


6

I participated in a tiny supporting role in a few crash investigations involving CRJs, so I'll give it a shot, and I would say that when a main cause is listed, especially for something mechanical, it's what you might call a "primary trigger", without which, follow-on supporting factors and events that led to the crash would never have occurred. Or an ...


10

Because of a high speed impact The official accident report published by the Komite Nasional Keselamatan Transportasi (KNKT) shows the data from the FDR (flight data recorder) for the accident flight. This is the altitude and airspeed it recorded: As you can see, the aircraft reached an airspeed of around 450 kt before the FDR stopped recording (the Vmo of ...


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