17

Note that the report says "derived from witness marks on the preload plates", so the investigators did not use witness marks on propeller blades to determine the blade angle. This might have been possible, as scratches and the deformation of the blade tip do, to some extent, manifest blade angle, but you would need to take into account the speed at ...


11

Yes! More or less, it depends on your definition of failure (see later). As you said, the probability that three Inertial Reference Units (IRUs) fail is extremely rare. This is because IRUs are self-contained, internal to the aircraft, and independents. Instead, air data probes are subject to ice and external factors (for instance, bird strikes), thus more ...


9

I'll assume you're talking about an English common law jurisdiction (UK, US, Can, Aus, NZ etc.). In those places it's always "innocent until proven guilty", the key thing being what "proven" means. You have to separate criminal liability, breaking of a law in the criminal code, from civil liability (a civil wrong, or "tort" in ...


8

Just to set things straight, accident investigation performed as per ICAO Annex 13 (Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation) and criminal investigation regarding an aviation accident are separate processes. The "Annex 13" investigations aim to find out why an accident happened, so it is focussed on reason(s). The purpose of this is to prevent ...


7

Very intriguing question. I do wonder what it actually solves, though. Does it only solve the mystery of whether the very rare instance of incapacitation of the flight crew occurred? The Cockpit Voice Recorder does that if it is recovered. In the rare event that the CVR is unrecoverable, the dead man’s switch would only answer if pilot input occurred prior ...


5

This website has a very comprehensive description and analysis of MCAS: http://www.b737.org.uk/mcas.htm I find it to be the most accurate of all the various sources often quoted. Here is a small quote from that website: MCAS is a longitudinal stability enhancement. It is not for stall prevention (although indirectly it helps) or to make the MAX handle like ...


5

From the NTSB accident report: Pilot Training On October 4, 1982, the pilot started receiving flight instruction. Over the next 6 years, he flew with six different CFIs. During this period, the pilot logged 47 hours, consisting of 46 hours of dual instruction and 1 hour without a CFI on board. The pilot made no entries in his logbook from September 1988 to ...


4

Hot-air Balloons are already made with large holes in them. They are called vents. They can be located in the balloon’s top or sides. They tend to be much much larger than the 4-inch diameter you described in your question. But, their opening and closing are controlled by the pilots. Research the FAA Balloon Flying Handbook. It will give you much more ...


4

In response to two NTSB safety recommendations, the FAA stated that it has only identified three accidents involving pilots with valid medical qualifications in which color vision deficiency (CVD) was cited as a contributing cause. As you mention above, on July 26, 2002, a Federal Express Boeing 727-200F crashed during a visual approach to Tallahassee ...


3

If a "ghost" airplane with passed out pilots is unattended and the engines flame out, what is likely to happen is it will fly along on autopilot until one engine flames out a few minutes before the other. This will impose a pretty large amount of yaw, which the airplane's yaw damper may or may not have enough authority to counteract. Yaw dampers ...


3

Don't go by Wikipedia. Read the congressional report on the issue here. Stall comes into the issue in a peripheral way, but it's not what the system itself was addressing. It was addressing behaviour that could nudge the unwary pilot closer to the stall region you might say, but not stall recovery, or behaviour in the stall itself (maybe "nothing ...


3

In this case, it's most likely that the source for the story (the airline?) simply chose not to name the pilot and the editor of the Wikipedia article didn't seek another source that might have done so. It's virtually certain that the pilot's name appears in the official reports of the incident. The airline likely chose not to give the name for PR or legal ...


1

After occurrences such as AF447, industry study has concluded that the "startle factor" comes into play during these 'Upset' scenarios. Formal study of aerodynamic theory is, for most pilots, a thing from the distant past. There develops a reluctance to make simple aerodynamic interpretation. Apart from this gawk factor there's a bit of "this ...


1

a manufacturer is guilty for that accident until innocence is proven that the manufactured device did not produce the defect causing the crash. No, someone has found some evidence of a "defect" after the crash and filed a lawsuit on these grounds. How sound this evidence is, and what exactly is the "defect" doesn't matter at this point: ...


1

As Ron Beyer’s answer stated, JFK Jr. was roughly halfway through the practical portion of his instrument training. He had completed the knowledge test but was not ready to do the checkride. What happened to him was really getting into an extremely insidious situation which, based on his flying experience, it’s reasonable to believe he could not have ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible