Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about words, phrases and definitions that are specific to aviation or used in a different way in aviation.

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7
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1answer
967 views

Is “lower pressurization” the correct term for the 787 Dreamliner?

In this blog, the FA refers to the 787 Dreamliner as having "lower pressurization": http://theflightattendantlife.com/the-boeing-787-8-a-flight-attendant-takes-you-on-an-inside-tour-of-the-dreamliner/...
7
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2answers
17k views

What is the difference between Cruise and Service ceilings?

I am looking at aircraft performance data. There are charts for "Cruise Ceiling" and "Service Ceiling." What is the difference? (The cruise altitude is lower.)
7
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1answer
479 views

When passing a waypoint, when exactly are we on the next leg?

When performing one of the procedures shown in the pictures below, when exactly do we consider ourselves to be on the next leg? For example: for the fly-by waypoint, when do we consider that we are ...
7
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3answers
717 views

What is the best word for lateral translational movement in a rotorcraft?

I'm talking about movement left and right without changing attitude. This is a motion that can be done with a quadcopter and to a limited extent a helicopter (I presume). On a helicopter a left/...
7
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2answers
5k views

What is the difference between a Boeing Line number and a Block number?

We know that every Boeing aircraft has a Line number, Block number, and MSN number. I want to know what what does it mean by this Line Number or Block number. and what are the difference among these ...
7
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1answer
330 views

Why do we commonly use a “/” in acronyms in aviation world?

In non-aviation world, separation between letters in acronyms is either nothing (e.g. URL) or a point (e.g. A.M.). But in the aviation world, the "/" is common (e.g. G/S, V/S). I'm puzzled as: some ...
7
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2answers
382 views

What does “leave clear on its left” mean in UK regulations relating to collision avoidance on non-runway landings?

This doesn't seem to be plain English, could someone explain this with a simple example for me please? I'm not sure what 'Leave clear on it's left' means, and it's not clear whether the subject of the ...
7
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1answer
552 views

What do you call the portion of a tail-dragger takeoff when the tail is in the air?

During a take-off roll out down the runway, in a tail-dragger airplane, what is the period of time called where the plane is level, with the main gear still on the runway, but the tail has come up off ...
7
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1answer
184 views

How are “charter” and “passenger” flights defined in the AIDX standard?

I'd like to know the difference between these flight types in the IATA AIDX standard; specifically, for use in fuel order notifications.
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5answers
14k views

Why is port-starboard terminology used in aviation?

I am not a pilot - just a student & play Ace Combat sometimes Intrigued by the words Starboard & Port-side I researched why these words are used instead of the simple ones, I found that: ...
6
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4answers
2k views

Does the expression “stall speed” have a definition?

I read, not only on this site, that the stall speed of an airfoil doesn't exist, and I usually make the effort to stay away from this expression. While an airfoil can stall at any airspeed, it's ...
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3answers
1k views

Jettison and Dump fuel - Do they have separate meanings?

According to the definitions, is there any difference between Jettison and Dump fuel? Does one of them use a different procedure, or they are simply synonyms?
6
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4answers
16k views

What is fly-by-wire?

What exactly does the term "fly-by-wire" mean? Where did it originate? I understand that it refers to control systems. If an aircraft is not fly-by-wire, what is it? That is, what are the alternatives?...
6
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1answer
424 views

Why do we say “climb” and not “ascend”?

The term for moving to a lower altitude is "descending." Why, then, is the term for moving to a higher altitude "climbing" and not "ascending"? The latter goes better with the term "descending." Does ...
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2answers
1k views

What is meant by a fused radar track?

Can anyone explain what a fused track is from the perspective of radar?
6
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1answer
2k views

What is the difference between redundancy and fault tolerance?

What is the difference between redundancy and fault tolerance in the context of aviation ?
6
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1answer
2k views

What are the components of a crew pairing?

I need to do some modeling for an FRMS system. By crew pairing I mean a sequence of flights that starts and ends at crew base. From my understanding, crew pairings are made of: Duty periods, which ...
6
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2answers
2k views

What do taxiway lane, taxiway strip and taxiway shoulder mean?

I am developing a game which involves an airport simulation. And I am looking into the general rules that traffic control has for busy airports and am also confused on the terminology of a taxiway. ...
6
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1answer
1k views

What is the name for a flight crew that includes extra members for a longer flight?

For short haul flights, airlines fly with BASIC CREW. For long haul flights, the crew must be composed for another crew or "extra" crew members, less than a crew. What's the designation of the crew, ...
6
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1answer
1k views

What are the correct names for the two faces of an airfoil?

Usual case When representing a wing airfoil, often: The lift is positive The upper surface is the one with low pressure. So the airfoil faces can just be called upper and lower surfaces and we ...
6
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1answer
3k views

In Raymer diagram “Take off parameter- Take off distance”, what is the difference among “balanced field length”, “over 50 ft”, “ground roll”?

Raymer in his book suggests a method to find wing loading W/S (for example we consider jet with 2 engines) (starting from specific thrust $\frac TW$, $CL_{to}$, density/reference density etc.). In ...
6
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3answers
2k views

How would one define or explain the term “unloading the controls?”

I've heard people say "unload the controls" or "unload the wing/propeller." What does this mean exactly? It is usually followed by releasing back pressure on the elevators or starting/ending a turn.
6
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1answer
447 views

Why is this chart called a Short Field Effort Takeoff Ground Roll and not simply a Short Field Takeoff Ground Roll?

What does the word 'effort' mean in this context?
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1answer
308 views

Who first coined the phrase “aviate, navigate, communicate”?

The phrase "aviate, navigate, communicate" describes the priorities of tasks for a pilot. It is applicable to a wide variety of situations, including military scenarios and emergencies. Who first ...
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4answers
16k views

Why do “angels” mean MSL, not AGL?

In military aviation, crews will sometimes refer to "angels" meaning MSL altitude. However, one might guess that it is a pronunciation of AGL (AnGeL), above ground level. Did it originally mean AGL ...
5
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3answers
1k views

Does tailless means no tail at all?

When I was reading about the HAL Tejas I observed that it was described as a "tailless" plane. However I could see a tail in the picture. After careful reading I am assuming that being tailless means ...
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3answers
6k views

What is the difference between the words “airlines” and “airways” semantically?

I wonder what the difference between the words "airlines" and "airways" is. Do you have any information on this? I am asking this question to find out why some air carriers use "airlines" while ...
5
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1answer
757 views

Is this “bearing” sentence utterly incorrect?

There is often tremendous confusion between bearing, track and similar terms. On Wikipedia, I saw the following sentence: NOTE CAREFULLY, THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE IS WRONG... In aerial navigation, ...
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3answers
11k views

What is a flat rated engine?

I've heard that a "Flat Rated Engine" is an engine where the power is reduced to keep the internal temperature within certain limits when the ambient temperature is above a certain point. Is that ...
5
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1answer
4k views

What defines a landing gear bogie?

(Wikipedia) A Boeing 737 main landing gear arrangement. What defines a landing gear bogie (truck)? In its airframe maintenance handbook, the FAA defines it as: When more than two wheels are ...
5
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2answers
595 views

What is the most accurate geometric plane for referencing terrestrial flight attitude?

I have found various definitions for attitude. Merriam Webster: inclination of the three principal axes of an airplane in flight to the relative wind. Wikipedia - Attitude Indicator: the orientation ...
5
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1answer
303 views

Has the FAA moved to change its use of gender-specific words like airman?

Last year, the United States Navy was ordered to review all of its job titles related to gender reference, e.g. yeoman, fireman and seaman. The Air Force has initiatives to fully integrate women in ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between Flight Test and Test Flight?

What is the difference between Test Flight and Flight Test? Are they the same thing or synonymous?
5
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1answer
731 views

What is the meaning of HOT-1, HOT-2, CAM, etc., in cockpit voice recorder transcripts?

When reading the the written down recordings of CVR like here, for instance, it is common to see abbreviations like HOT-1, HOT-2 or CAM. I guess that CVR records multiple channels and the codes ...
5
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1answer
1k views

What are endplates? How do they work?

Winglets have been discussed fairly regularly, but not much can be found on the topic of endplates. What are endplates, how do they work, and how do they relate to winglets?
5
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1answer
94 views

What are the names of the forces acting upon the side of a vessel?

People often refer to the four forces in navigation as weight, lift, thrust and drag. Are there separate names for the forces acting upon the side of a craft?
5
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2answers
2k views

Should people flying UAVs be called “Operators” or “Pilots”?

I'm wondering if there is any formal/official definition* pertaining to the title given to people controlling Unmanned Aerial Vehicles? Are they "more" correctly titled Operators or Pilots? *As set ...
5
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2answers
2k views

What, exactly is “on the MEL”?

The MEL, minimum equipment list, defines whether fault of some equipment on the aircraft prevents it from being dispatched for flight or not. However, sometimes (e.g. in comments to this question) ...
5
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1answer
958 views

What does QBD stand for? [duplicate]

I recently heard the term QBD which the Aviation Dictionary explains is the fuel endurance in terms of hours. If it is an acronym, what is its expansion? If not, what is it derived from?
5
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2answers
467 views

What qualifies as a “takeoff” and “landing” in currency requirements?

I just met my night-time currency requirements at KONT. Landing and taking off from a 12000 foot runway in a Cessna 152 got me to thinking (always dangerous, I know). There's more than enough room ...
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2answers
228 views

“Total time away from gate”, “Longest time away from gate” - what does this mean?

In the US, airlines or airports report two figures regarding canceled flights: the total time away from the gate and the single longest time away from the gate. and regarding diverted flights: ...
5
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2answers
545 views

What does 'given rate' mean?

I was watching this video: At around 1:28 I heard the controller clear a plane to descend to a level "given rate". I was searching online but couldn't seem to find ...
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2answers
1k views

What is an Airline?

What is a good definition for the term "Airline"? The term is used extensively, and it's meaning is well understood at the one end of the spectrum: air carriers flying passengers on large aircraft on ...
5
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1answer
6k views

Are QDM and QDR the same as 'inbound' and 'outbound' courses?

I'm about to take my last test to join an airline: the simulator. I've been told they ask to perform some QDR/QDM interceptions, as well as radial ones. About QDM/QDR: QDM: Magnetic course from the ...
4
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2answers
456 views

Why are some Tomahawk missiles' nose duck-nose shaped?

Why there is a duck-like shape in this Tomahawk missile's nose? I see this shape in most Tomahawk images; however, not every Tomahawk's nose is shaped like this. If it is an aerodynamic feature, ...
4
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between a vertical stabilizer and a rudder?

I saw two questions on locating these surfaces ahead of CG: Vertical Stabilizer and Rudder How are these the same or different control surfaces?
4
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3answers
1k views

Why does the Trent XWB have intermediate compressor stages?

I realized that the Rolls-Royce Trent XWB on the Airbus A350 has intermediate compressor stages. Why is that? Other engines like the CFM56 or IAE V2500 that power most of the A320-family have low ...
4
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1answer
11k views

What's the difference between FMS and FMC?

What's the difference between FMS (Flight management System), and FMC (Flight management computer)? Can the flight management computer be thought of as what's manipulating the input information from ...
4
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3answers
2k views

What is the section of the fuselage below the wings called?

Is there a specific name for the protruding section of fuselage beneath the wings? Im talking about the area where the landing gear bay often is. In the photo it's where the red Emirates logo is ...
4
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3answers
2k views

Is there a difference between a chart and map?

Does the use or meaning of "chart" or "map" vary worldwide? Is there a difference between a chart and map?