The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about words, phrases and definitions that are specific to aviation or used in a different way in aviation.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
2answers
381 views

Would an ASTERIX decoder be “radar data processing” or “surveillance data processing”?

I am not an air traffic controller, I am a software engineer. I developed an ASTERIX decoder, the application will just extract all the information and save it in a text file. I am just wondering how ...
8
votes
1answer
683 views

Why is an ATC operational error called a “deal”?

Air Traffic Controllers who lose separation between aircraft call that event a "deal". Why? When the Conflict Alert function was added to the computer system, it reported conflicts to the area ...
14
votes
1answer
4k views

What, exactly, is a “co-pilot”?

When I speak of a co-worker, or a co-driver, I'm speaking of a mutual relationship and status (that's simply how the prefix co works in normal English) and I'm pretty sure it's what most people mean ...
16
votes
3answers
30k views

What is the difference between GPS, GNSS and RNAV?

I would like to know the fundamental difference between GPS, GNSS and RNAV. How are they related each other? Are all/some of them synonyms?
7
votes
3answers
663 views

What exactly does it mean, that plane has diverted due to the needs of a passenger?

Twitter account for Flightradar24 has reported twice in past 24 hours about two different British Airways flights that has diverted their original route "due to the needs of a passenger" (here and ...
0
votes
0answers
164 views

What is the ASTERIX terminology for an atomic piece of information?

The ASTERIX standard defines the smallest piece of metadata information: Data Item: The smallest unit of information in each Data Category. And the implementation equivalent: Data Field: ...
16
votes
1answer
6k views

What is the difference between fail-safe and fail-soft?

I have heard the following terms related to safe system design but I cannot really see a difference between fail-safe and fail-soft (graceful degradation). To get a common understanding I will just ...
3
votes
1answer
414 views

What does “redatum” means?

I was doing a question about a fully hydraulic elevator and it's position in relation to the trimmable horizontal stabiliser and the explanation of the answer contained the word "redatum". What does ...
10
votes
1answer
419 views

How long has the term “situational awareness” been used in aviation?

I was puzzled to read (Wikipedia article on situational awareness) that: The term can be traced to World War I, where it was recognized as a crucial skill for crews in military aircraft. but in ...
4
votes
3answers
10k views

What is a flat rated engine?

I've heard that a "Flat Rated Engine" is an engine where the power is reduced to keep the internal temperature within certain limits when the ambient temperature is above a certain point. Is that ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between a nautical mile and a statute mile? And what is a knot?

What is the difference between a "nautical mile" and a "statute mile?" And what is a "knot?"
4
votes
2answers
251 views

How to decide which aerodromes should have Electronic Terrain and Obstacle Data?

What is the meaning of "aerodrome that is regularly used in international civil aviation"? Is there any explanation or reference material in support of Aeronautical Information System (AIS)? I found ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Where to find comprehensive description of Special Use Airspaces (SUAs)? [closed]

Can you suggest me some document or website where I can learn about Special Use Airspaces? My goal is to understand the following topics: SUA definition Types of SUAs SUA pubblication SUA creation ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Does tailless means no tail at all?

When I was reading about the HAL Tejas I observed that it was described as a "tailless" plane. However I could see a tail in the picture. After careful reading I am assuming that being tailless means ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

What defines a landing gear bogie?

(Wikipedia) A Boeing 737 main landing gear arrangement. What defines a landing gear bogie (truck)? In its airframe maintenance handbook, the FAA defines it as: When more than two wheels are ...
9
votes
2answers
5k views

Where does the term 'steam cockpit' come from?

Why are traditional style cockpits with gauges called 'steam cockpits'? Do the instruments actually run on steam?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the section of the fuselage below the wings called?

Is there a specific name for the protruding section of fuselage beneath the wings? Im talking about the area where the landing gear bay often is. In the photo it's where the red Emirates logo is ...
0
votes
2answers
168 views

What device in western countries allows ATC to get clearances or search flight plans automatically?

In Korea, there is a device called 'Flight data terminal' which enable air traffic controller to get clearance or search certain flight plans automatically. But I found that there is no 'FDT' in ...
5
votes
1answer
293 views

Has the FAA moved to change its use of gender-specific words like airman?

Last year, the United States Navy was ordered to review all of its job titles related to gender reference, e.g. yeoman, fireman and seaman. The Air Force has initiatives to fully integrate women in ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Should people flying UAVs be called “Operators” or “Pilots”?

I'm wondering if there is any formal/official definition* pertaining to the title given to people controlling Unmanned Aerial Vehicles? Are they "more" correctly titled Operators or Pilots? *As set ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

How would one define or explain the term “unloading the controls?”

I've heard people say "unload the controls" or "unload the wing/propeller." What does this mean exactly? It is usually followed by releasing back pressure on the elevators or starting/ending a turn.
1
vote
1answer
320 views

If an aircraft cannot fly above 300ft, is it an aircraft?

I saw a question here that inspired one of my own. If an larger, person carrying aircraft, say some sort of hovercraft, could not fly above 300 ft would it be allowed to fly? Here in Australia, 300ft ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

In Raymer diagram “Take off parameter- Take off distance”, what is the difference among “balanced field length”, “over 50 ft”, “ground roll”?

Raymer in his book suggests a method to find wing loading W/S (for example we consider jet with 2 engines) (starting from specific thrust $\frac TW$, $CL_{to}$, density/reference density etc.). In ...
4
votes
1answer
10k views

What's the difference between FMS and FMC?

What's the difference between FMS (Flight management System), and FMC (Flight management computer)? Can the flight management computer be thought of as what's manipulating the input information from ...
7
votes
3answers
697 views

What is the best word for lateral translational movement in a rotorcraft?

I'm talking about movement left and right without changing attitude. This is a motion that can be done with a quadcopter and to a limited extent a helicopter (I presume). On a helicopter a left/...
11
votes
4answers
6k views

What is the definition of taxiing?

According to Wikipedia the definition of taxiing is: the movement of the aircraft on the ground under its own power [however] push-back is not considered taxiing In contrast, Eurocontrol seems ...
13
votes
2answers
4k views

What does the word “boot” mean?

I found this word "boot" in one book. The chapter was connected with ICING operations, and I found this word with little explanation: A tube bonded to a surface, e.g. wing edge. When pressurized ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

What is the difference between the words “airlines” and “airways” semantically?

I wonder what the difference between the words "airlines" and "airways" is. Do you have any information on this? I am asking this question to find out why some air carriers use "airlines" while ...
2
votes
1answer
750 views

Is “passenger loading bridge” a synonym to “contact stand”?

In a master plan of an international airport, which is already approved by the client, I face some confusion between the terminology of the PLB and the contact stand. Sometimes they're mentioned just ...
3
votes
1answer
389 views

What is the meaning of T/O Thrust => TRQ / N1 in a flight log?

I work at a software company which builds record-keeping software for aviation. What is the meaning of TRQ / N1 in a flight log, under a ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What is a GDS (in the context of the airline industry)?

I have been looking at this article and throughout the article they mention GDS's but do not explain the terminology. Does somebody know what they are talking about - For e.g. - Three GDSs emerge ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

What is flight inspection, as provided by Cobham Aviation Services?

At about midnight, I saw a small plane (a Diamond Twin Star) take off from Heathrow, on flightradar24. It then proceeded to fly in irregular loops around North London, at low altitude, 1700ft. The ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What are the correct names for the two faces of an airfoil?

Usual case When representing a wing airfoil, often: The lift is positive The upper surface is the one with low pressure. So the airfoil faces can just be called upper and lower surfaces and we ...
3
votes
2answers
416 views

Is there anything in any airport called a “warm apron”?

I heard a pilot said they are located at big airports like LAX. But I couldn't find any information about it.
3
votes
1answer
123 views

What is the name of the figure consisting of a slow revolution around longitudinal axis? [duplicate]

"An airplane performing one slow revolution around its longitudinal axis is performing one of these..." This was a clue on Jeopardy today. The contestant responded with, "What is a barrel roll?" ...
15
votes
1answer
2k views

When buying airliners what is the difference between “orders”, “options” and “purchase rights”?

I've often seen announcements by aircraft manufacturers or operators along these lines "Qantas announced today that they will buy 10 A380's and have taken options on another 10". What does it mean to ...
2
votes
4answers
30k views

What is the true meaning of the word “wilco” when used on the radio? What is its origin?

Pilots often learn to use the word "wilco" on the radio through contextual interpretation. During my experience as a pilot communicating on the radio I have often observed pilots using the word "wilco"...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

What does “Constant wind condition during flight” mean?

What is constant wind condition during flight? Is it zero wind velocity at an instant (say at level flight) or wind with constant speed, say 20 m/sec (at steady level flight or whatever it is) Which ...
8
votes
2answers
968 views

What is the name for the Mitsubishi A6M Zero's one-piece wing/fuselage?

The Wikipedia article on Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighter cites an article from Life magazine published on Nov 4, 1942: The Zero's fuselage and wings were constructed in one piece, unlike the American ...
3
votes
1answer
172 views

What is that term to describe the wing motion range?

What is that term naming the range of motion of the wings when on the ground (hanging/drooping) then bends upwards during flight?
6
votes
5answers
13k views

Why is port-starboard terminology used in aviation?

I am not a pilot - just a student & play Ace Combat sometimes Intrigued by the words Starboard & Port-side I researched why these words are used instead of the simple ones, I found that: ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the regulatory definition of AOG?

What is the legal or regulatory definition of AOG (Aircraft on Ground)? For example, this is sometimes stamped on a repair order.
3
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference between fuel exhaustion and starvation?

Is there any technical difference between fuel exhaustion and starvation? And what does it mean if a pilot says he has a "fuel shortage"?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between Fly-By and Short-Turn?

By all definitions that my team and I have found, fly-by and short-turn (with respect to military unmanned air vehicle waypoint based flight) mean the same thing. Briefly, this allows the pilot to ...
4
votes
1answer
240 views

What is the difference between SUA (Special Use Airspace) and FUA (Flexible Use Airspace)?

The EUROCONTROL Concept of the Flexible Use of Airspace (FUA) is that: an ASM concept currently applied in the ECAC area and based on the fundamental principle that airspace should no longer be ...
3
votes
1answer
449 views

What is the difference between directs and shortcuts in the Route Availability Document?

I am studying about directs and shortcuts in aviation. While flying, an airplane can move from an airway to another by using directs or shortcuts. What I want understand is the difference between ...
7
votes
2answers
822 views

Does the “bat wing” aircraft paint design have a proper name?

I would like to do a web search for different planes that have utilised the "bat wing" paint application noticeable on the wings below? What keywords should I search for?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What is an Airline?

What is a good definition for the term "Airline"? The term is used extensively, and it's meaning is well understood at the one end of the spectrum: air carriers flying passengers on large aircraft on ...
3
votes
2answers
265 views

Which is the technically correct term: Nose Gear or Nose Landing Gear?

Talking about landing gear system, came across my mind the correct and technical name. Is it NOSE GEAR or NOSE LANDING GEAR?
1
vote
1answer
414 views

What is the aviation term for what the navy calls “fire control system”?

The weapons systems, including computers etc, in a naval ship can be referred to as the Fire Control System. I'm not sure if FCS would be considered an appropriate acronym for fire control; I'm using ...