Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about words, phrases and definitions that are specific to aviation or used in a different way in aviation.

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9
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1answer
2k views

What does YF stand for?

I know that F=fighter, A=attack, F/A=fighter/attack, B=bomber. I can not find any information on what YF stands for. This type of aircraft is usually an experimental aircraft, but why do modern ...
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4answers
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What is fly-by-wire?

What exactly does the term "fly-by-wire" mean? Where did it originate? I understand that it refers to control systems. If an aircraft is not fly-by-wire, what is it? That is, what are the alternatives?...
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4answers
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What is a canard?

While browsing this Stack Exchange, I regularly come across mentions of canards. I am not familiar with this term, and Google only gives information about ducks when I search for "canard". So, what is ...
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3answers
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Why do we call moving an aircraft on the ground “taxi”?

We all know what "taxi" means to general public -- a car which carries you from A to B in exchange for your paying a fare. "Taxi" also means to drive an aircraft on the ground. Why do we call it that?...
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What is the difference between centre of pressure, aerodynamic centre and neutral point?

I have just started learning some aerospace concepts, and I am not able to understand the difference between the three terms centre of pressure, aerodynamic centre and neutral point. What are their ...
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Is there a name for the area for aircraft to back track near the runway threshold?

Some airports have an area, on the threshold, used to back track the aircraft, mainly because of the their wingspan, they look like a half wheel. Is there any designation for this area?
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Is there a difference between “aerobatic” and “acrobatic” flight?

I hear and read both the terms "aerobatic" and "acrobatic" used to describe the more extreme maneuvers such as spins, rolls, loops and more. My questions is about the terms themselves. It seems that ...
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What does the NetJets “QS” stand for?

Every NetJets aircraft that I've seen has a tail number ending in QS. Knowing aircraft operators, I'm sure it stands for something, but I don't know what. What does the QS stand for in NetJets tail ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between “sensitive” and “non-sensitive” altimeters?

In this answer reference was made to "sensitive" and "non-sensitive" altimeters. What is the definition of each, what are the differences, and why would one be used in preference to the other? And ...
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2answers
163 views

Fuel price actually used in the industry [closed]

I know it's a bit off-topic but I guess some of the terminology used in the aircraft community is the same as in marine transportation. I know that both aircraft and marine vessels use fuel. But if I'...
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What is needed to certify an aerodrome as an airport in Canada?

So here. All airports are aerodromes. All aerodromes are not airports. Difference between Airport and Aerodrome: An aerodrome or airdrome is any place from where flight operations can take place....
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1answer
884 views

What does QBD stand for? [duplicate]

I recently heard the term QBD which the Aviation Dictionary explains is the fuel endurance in terms of hours. If it is an acronym, what is its expansion? If not, what is it derived from?
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Why is port-starboard terminology used in aviation?

I am not a pilot - just a student & play Ace Combat sometimes Intrigued by the words Starboard & Port-side I researched why these words are used instead of the simple ones, I found that: ...
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3answers
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Regarding N1 and N2, what does the “N” stand for?

I initially phrased this question in a comment to another question regarding what N1 and N2 mean, hoping it would be that sort of low-hanging fruit that is easily answerable and not worth a proper ...
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4answers
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What is the difference between slice, segment and leg?

I have heard of the terms slice, segment and leg. Since I am a newbie in travel industry, I would like to know and understand the basic differences between the three. Could someone please explain ...
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1answer
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What are the meanings of these terms related to instrument flight?

Please describe and define the following terms: Homing 0 degree relative bearing Tracking Hold Entry Holding pattern What are its uses and purposes? Any one to suggest a thorough instrument book as ...
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1answer
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If an airplane touches down short of the runway, and doesn't reach it, is it still a runway excursion?

In light of the two recent incidents where aircraft landed roughly 1000 ft short of their intended runways, Air Canada AC-624 at Halifax and Asiana OZ-162 at Hiroshima, I started thinking the ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between aviation “accident” and “incident”?

When I hear speaking about aviation crashes, sometimes I hear about "accidents" and other times about "incidents". What distinguishes them? Is there an international standard that determines how ...
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Is “General Aviation” a well-defined term in the US, in the EU and/or elsewhere?

In this earlier question I tentatively assume that GA means civil aircraft operations other than scheduled passenger transport - what I think of as "airliner" operation though it could include quite ...
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What is the correct name for this ILS Indicator?

What is the correct terminology for the name of the aircraft instrument that looks like this?
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1answer
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Why is it called “base” leg?

When flying a circuit, the leg after downwind and before final is called base. Where does this name come from?
11
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1answer
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What does a “hard stand departure” mean?

I am reading a table explaining how to plan multiple diversion returns from an individual station: widebody gate departures - xx minutes narrow body gate departures - xx minutes all hard ...
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What is the difference between “flight level” and “altitude”?

I have seen references to "FL180" and "FL300", and I know that they stand for Flight Level 180 and Flight Level 300. I've also seen references to "an altitude of 18000ft" or "an altitude of 30000ft". ...
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1answer
678 views

What does “500 and 1” mean?

In this AVWeb article, numerous references are made to 500 and 1, with other references to 3,000 and 5. Based on the statement <...
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1answer
714 views

Is this “bearing” sentence utterly incorrect?

There is often tremendous confusion between bearing, track and similar terms. On Wikipedia, I saw the following sentence: NOTE CAREFULLY, THE FOLLOWING SENTENCE IS WRONG... In aerial navigation, ...
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What do taxiway lane, taxiway strip and taxiway shoulder mean?

I am developing a game which involves an airport simulation. And I am looking into the general rules that traffic control has for busy airports and am also confused on the terminology of a taxiway. ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between Fly-By and Short-Turn?

By all definitions that my team and I have found, fly-by and short-turn (with respect to military unmanned air vehicle waypoint based flight) mean the same thing. Briefly, this allows the pilot to ...
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Is an engine surge classed as an engine fire?

Sometimes flames come out from the exhaust due to bearing distress or turbine blade fracture. Can such flames/fire be considered an engine fire?
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5answers
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What exactly is a “drone”?

I was under the impression that things like this: and soon this and even this Are drones. When and how did the media and the general public get the idea that these: Are also drones? I'm not ...
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3answers
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What's an “altitude engine”?

FAR 91.205(b)(8) says that you need a manifold pressure gauge for each "altitude engine", whatever that means. What's an "altitude" engine?
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1answer
889 views

What does it mean for a payload to be “caged”?

If an aircraft has a movable payload (e.g. camera) attached to it, two of the status modes are caged and stowed. Stowed indicates the payload is retracted and or in a locked position. What is ...
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What is a running rabbit?

My father used to work as an air traffic controller, and often I heard mention of a 'running rabbit'. Obviously, vermin on the runways of airports can be a bad thing, but I don't think he was ...
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2answers
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How do engineers log airplane maintenance?

Is there an encoding system that replaces the vagueness of natural language when it comes to logging aircraft problems or repairs that took place at a specific site on the airplane? So, instead of ...
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2answers
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What do jet pilots say during the takeoff as they are speeding down the runway?

I was watching a documentary on youtube and the pilots always say something that sounds like "B1E" when they have enough speed to take off. What exactly are they saying, and why do they say it?
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What is the definition of taxiing?

According to Wikipedia the definition of taxiing is: the movement of the aircraft on the ground under its own power [however] push-back is not considered taxiing In contrast, Eurocontrol seems ...
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1answer
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When buying airliners what is the difference between “orders”, “options” and “purchase rights”?

I've often seen announcements by aircraft manufacturers or operators along these lines "Qantas announced today that they will buy 10 A380's and have taken options on another 10". What does it mean to ...
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3answers
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What is the name of the maximum altitude at which a helicopter can fly?

What is the name of the maximum altitude at which a helicopter can fly? I recall it as "vertical limit", but I can't find a Wikipedia page for it other than a movie of the same title, which seems to ...
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3answers
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Why is the “Dutch” roll called so?

Why is the "Dutch" roll called so? When did this name enter common usage, and what is its origin? Please cite sources if possible!
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3answers
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What are the differences between Bearing vs Course vs Direction vs Heading vs Track?

This answer from English.SE does not focus on aviation, and does not explain 'Track'. In basic, simple English, would you please compare and contrast all 5 terms in my question's title? The ...
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1answer
620 views

What is TAPS in this report?

In researching for this question, I came across some reports from EASA referring to TAPS. What is the meaning of TAPS in this context?
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1answer
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What is the origin of the term “Tyro” for inexperienced pilots?

Over the years I have been aware of the term "Tyro" to mean a new or inexperienced pilot. I'm pretty sure it is/was used more in a military setting than a GA one, but none the less I was interested to ...
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Why is the autopilot called “George?”

The autopilot of an airplane is frequently referred to as "George" (for example, in this answer). When did this nickname enter common usage, and what is its origin? Please cite sources if possible!
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1answer
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What do you call the portion of a tail-dragger takeoff when the tail is in the air?

During a take-off roll out down the runway, in a tail-dragger airplane, what is the period of time called where the plane is level, with the main gear still on the runway, but the tail has come up off ...
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1answer
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Why are the power and drag curves called polars?

See Wikipedia:Drag polar and Wikipedia:Polar curve (aviation) for example. These curves are not on a polar coordinate system. Why are they called polars?
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Where does the term 'steam cockpit' come from?

Why are traditional style cockpits with gauges called 'steam cockpits'? Do the instruments actually run on steam?
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3answers
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What are the differences between various simulator levels?

I've heard of level A, B, C, and D simulators, (as well as FTD and AATDs) but know nothing about them. What criteria is used to certify a sim as a particular level?
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What exactly is a QRH?

In this question about aircraft dumping fuel I was told that there may possible be guidance in the QRH. I know that there are a lot of guidelines given to pilots, but I've never heard of this one. ...
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If the “Fuel Shutoff Valve” is ON, wouldn't fuel be cut off?

Ok, so this may be more of an english lanugage question, and I can confirm from context that when the fuel shutoff valve is ON fuel does indeed flow to the engine, but wouldn't that just make more ...
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What does the term “trimming” most commonly mean in aviation?

Why does an airplane need trim, and what does it do during the flight? Does an autopilot adjust the trim automatically?