Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about words, phrases and definitions that are specific to aviation or used in a different way in aviation.

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2answers
94 views

What is the full-form of ATA?

I was going through FCOM of A320 and came to know that FCOM chapters are called as ATAs. So first of all what is its full- form and secondly why do we call the chapters ATAs ?
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1answer
143 views

Fly a fixed wing single propeller airplane like a helicopter?

Has anyone tried to "helicopter" an airplane? And succeeded? And posted this video on the internet where I can find it? What I'm talking about with what I would call a "helicopter&...
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1answer
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What is the difference between a service manual and a maintenance manual?

What is the difference between service manual and maintenance manual? Because sometimes I found one, sometimes I found another, the content is similar but not the same. What are the differences and ...
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2answers
92 views

What are differences between vortex, swirl, eddies and wake?

These terms seem to have the same meanings. Can anyone differentiate them?
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2answers
107 views

What does scheduled departure time exactly mean?

I am trying to understand the (sometimes subtle) differences between various terminologies concerning flight schedules. What I find difficult to understand is how exactly the scheduled departure time ...
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3answers
1k views

How are the wings of a mono- bi- or triplane referred to with regard to position?

Apologies if this is an elementary question. If I look at a diagram for parts of a plane, they don't distinguish verbally between left/right. If I try Googling for, say, "right wing" or &...
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2answers
132 views

Why are flight instructors in the US called CFIs?

I live in EASA-land (Europe), here we call our flight instructors simply that, "FIs". That they hold an instructors certificate is simply implied. Why are flight instructors in FAA-land (US) ...
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2answers
200 views

Is there a standard term for “3D groundspeed”?

Does the term "groundspeed" always refer only to the magnitude of the horizontal component of an aircraft's velocity vector with respect to the earth, or does it sometimes include the ...
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2answers
361 views

What, if any, would be the most correct term for the aerodynamic flight control surfaces of SpaceX's Starship?

SpaceX's Starship uses a unique flight control scheme during descent that I have not seen anywhere except with skydivers: it falls straight down belly-first using four aerodynamic control surfaces at ...
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1answer
525 views

What is the origin of the “Pickle” switch for release of ordnance?

I am looking for proper proof of the theory that it is called so due to the Norden sight of the B17, which was said to assist the bomber in putting a bomb into a pickle jar, and hence it stuck.
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1answer
57 views

What classification of aerial vehicle would a manned quadcopter or octocopter be?

US here, if it makes a difference (w.r.t. FAA regulation, etc.). There's a new upcoming class of aerial vehicles, similar to drones, however they are gigantic and they are manned -- that is, manned (...
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2answers
46 views

Degree of motion terminology for special aviation movements

I perfectly understand yaw, pitch and roll. I'm wondering what a few special terms are for other unusual movements, such as those executed by a helicopter, drone or even perhaps something like a ...
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0answers
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On the B737 FCTM, what are the limit values for strong and gust definitions?

There are definitions called as "Gusty and Strong Crosswind Condition" related to takeoff thrust setting choice and "Strong Crosswind" in touchdown in crab part of B737NG FCTM. I ...
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1answer
242 views

What use was there for Boeing to include customer numbers in their aircraft model names, and why did they end this practice?

Inspired by this question (thanks Hot Network Questions!). The tl;dr is that Boeing included a unique numeric model number designation, referring to the customer that had purchased a particular plane, ...
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2answers
3k views

Does a Boeing 747-830 exist and if it does, is there any difference to a 747-8 (748)

Two years ago I've uploaded a video of the Lufthansas Boeing 747 "D-ABYA" to Youtube. I am currently receiving some angry comments on that video because the title reads "747-830 with ...
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2answers
2k views

From an ATC perspective, what is an “arrival gate”?

I have seen reference to ATC assigned "arrival gates". As a passenger, an "arrival gate" is something like B12 or ...
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1answer
117 views

What is the difference between a spin and an uncontrolled roll in an high speed dive?

A comment I had on another (now deleted) question states that Air china 006 didn't spin. For me it was a spin (unwanted roll due to asymmetrical stall). The comment states it was "it was a slow ...
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2answers
858 views

What is the standard date format used in aviation?

As English is the standard language used in aviation and Zulu/UTC time is used as standard too or at least between pilots to calculate flight time and fuel. Is there any standard date format used in ...
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3answers
163 views

What is the correct term for the type of performance chart where curved lines are followed?

What is the correct term for the type of performance chart where, from a starting location, curved lines are followed to various reference points to eventually find a solution? For a specific example, ...
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1answer
4k views

What does “running torque” mean?

I would like to know the meaning of the phrase and especially the meaning of "running torque": Torque the inner plug to between 75 and 85lbf.in. Loosen half a turn and RETORQUE to between 15 and ...
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3answers
4k views

What is the purpose of classifying fighters?

Fighters are classified by generation, as explained in this answer. Given this Wikipedia sum up, some fighters are not clearly in a defined generation, especially for 4th generation subclasses. Thus ...
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3answers
2k views

What does “Raven” [phonetic] means when used by ATC?

What is the meaning of "Raven" [phonetic] heard in use at Reagan National Airport? Most recently heard: The ATC will say "proceed direct raven" or "direct raven maintain" whatever altitude; or "...
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6answers
1k views

Is there a more specific term than 'flight line' for straight lines flown during flight?

I work for a small software startup, where its just my boss and I. Prior to this job, I had no experience with aircraft. We have a client that uses our software to fly a pattern over an area, where ...
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1answer
106 views

What does ''Reduced Coordination Airspace'' mean?

What does ''Reduced Coordination Airspace'' mean? There is a definition in here, page 4 bottom image.
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5answers
260 views

Is there a proper term to use when you're referring to the total number of people on an aircraft, including both the passengers and crew/pilots?

I've found that often when people quote the number of passengers on an aircraft, they exclude the crew/pilots, which they'll provide separately. Is there a proper term to use when you're referring to ...
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1answer
4k views

Why does the auto brake panel on an A320 use “lo”, rather than “low”?

Is there a specific reason that Airbus chose to shorten "LOW" to "LO" for the lowest autobrake setting? Wouldn't it be more consistent to use three letters for each setting?
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1answer
90 views

What does “5B3/P” in CFM56-5B3/P mean?

For the CFM56 engine model CFM56-5B3/P, what does "5B3/P" mean?
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3answers
4k views

What is the name of the movement which is carried out by plane beginning from the runway and ending at takeoff?

What is the name of the movement which begins after the plane lines up on the runway and takeoff clearance is received, and ends when the plane lifts off from the runway? Is it also called as 'taxiing'...
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1answer
174 views

Does this web page really correctly depict the angle that is called “incidence” in the French language in the aviation context?

Does this web page really correctly depict the most common usage of the term "incidence" in the French language in the aviation context, in the context of speaking of an entire aircraft and not just ...
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1answer
141 views

A question about the exact meaning of one British usage of the term “Angle of Incidence”

This answer to a related question stated: Most anything can have an angle of attack. If you must be specific, you mention 'angle of attack of ...' ... When we talk about airplane as a whole, ...
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1answer
70 views

The meaning of “fully paid” [closed]

What is the meaning of "fully paid" in the airline industry? Based on my research it's an adjective and it means "paid for at full face value with no further money due from the stockholder", but I ...
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3answers
211 views

Is there a standard word or phrase in the English-speaking world to describe the angle between the fuselage and the flight path / relative wind?

Is there a standard word or phrase, or several alternative commonly-used words or phrases, in the English-speaking aviation world to describe the angle between the longitudinal axis of the fuselage, ...
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1answer
87 views

How common is it in current British usage for the angle between the chord line of a wing and the flight path to be called the “angle of incidence”?

In American usage, the angle between the chord line of a wing and the flight path is called the "angle of attack". The angle of attack is also represented by the greek letter "alpha". However, some ...
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7answers
7k views

What does “Ground loops are costly. Fly them until they stop” mean?

In one of the earliest scenes of William A. Wellman's 1942 film Thunder Birds, a sign can be seen in a room of a USAAF base (some relax or briefing room, apparently), which says: Ground loops are ...
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3answers
4k views

What is the piece that covers the top part of tires?

I would like to know the name and the usefulness of this piece that covers the top of the tire of some planes, such as some Cessnas.
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1answer
301 views

What is the term for an aileron that’s also used as a ground spoiler?

Ailerons and spoilers1 have a considerable amount in common; both are wing-mounted panels, hinged at their leading edges, that move up and/or down to alter the aircraft’s aerodynamic characteristics. ...
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6answers
5k views

What exactly is a “coordinated” turn?

I am wondering what turn coordination really means and what makes a turn uncoordinated? I know that when the turn is coordinated, there is no slip and skid, an aircraft is flying a perfect circle ...
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2answers
238 views

What is the meaning of “transition area” as used by the FAA? Has the meaning changed over time since the term was introduced?

What is the meaning of "transition area" as used by the FAA? Does it currently have a specific meaning? Does the FAA still use the term at all? Has the meaning changed over time since the term was ...
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1answer
15k views

What does “Boeing” mean?

We know about the existence of Boeing planes like the 737, 747, and other planes. But where did the name "Boeing" come from?
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1answer
134 views

Does the phrase “.78/280/250” have a standard meaning to an airline pilot, in the context of a long descent?

Does the phrase ".78/280/250" have a standard meaning to an airline pilot, in the context of a long descent? Specific context-- the table in this answer-- Is the descent performance of the PMDG 737-...
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1answer
4k views

What is an airliner's “green dot speed”, and how does it vary with weight, and why?

A related question told us, quoting from an Airbus performance manual, Green dot speed (minimum gradient) is a function of weight. Comments under the question stated that the "green dot speed" ...
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4answers
664 views

How do STOVL and V/STOL aircraft differ?

Wikipedia's page for STOVL begins with A short take-off and vertical landing aircraft (STOVL aircraft) is a fixed-wing aircraft that is able to take off from a short runway (or take off vertically ...
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4answers
5k views

What is an aircraft magneto?

I know that magnetos are related to the engine and that on many planes, they are used to start the engine. But what exactly do they do in the engine?
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2answers
112 views

“Gross” and “net” planned runway length for the Haifa airport

My city's mayor was just boasting on how she'd gotten an approval for an airport runway of length "2100 m gross, 1900 m net length", and that this would be enough to connect the city - Haifa - to hubs ...
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2answers
166 views

What is the difference between Review and Analysis in DO-178C?

In the context of DO-178C, what is the difference between review and analysis of the outputs of the software development processes? Are they both the same?
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7answers
7k views

At what point does an aircraft become an airliner?

For me, the term 'airliner' conjures up an image of a passenger jet that is capable of hosting a large number of passengers¹ but I'm finding it difficult to source a reputable definition or etymology ...
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3answers
345 views

What's the meaning of “the break is a level” in a recovery operation of an aircraft carrier?

The break is a level, 180° turn made at 800 feet (240 m), descending to 600 feet (180 m) when established downwind. Landing gear/flaps are lowered, and landing checks are completed. (source: wikimili....
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4answers
300 views

What is “company compensation fuel” and “pad fuel”?

I tried to find the definition of these fuels but I could't. Does anyone know about company compensation fuel or pad fuel? In which document can I find the definition of these fuels?
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1answer
240 views

What does “mission mixing” mean for long-range aircraft?

I know very little, like long-range aircraft will be used for short-range and medium-range operations. But what is the purpose of using them like that? Also I want to get complete details of "mission ...
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5answers
7k views

What does it mean when autoland is fail passive / fail operational?

The below explanation is what I've got from the internet about fail passive and fail operational: Fail operational - Where you have 3 autopilots engaged, such that any single failure will result in ...

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