Questions tagged [polar-curve]

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-3 votes
1 answer
207 views

What would be a good way to present airfoil performance diagrams and requirements to aircraft designers? [closed]

Airfoils perform in differing flight regimes (i.e., at take-off and cruise). The current practice is to plot $C_L$ .vs. $\alpha$ or $C_D$ at some $R_E$ (& perhaps Mach number). This is basic ...
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2 votes
2 answers
155 views

How does pitch relate to glide angle?

When flying a glider, you have a polar curve. As your speed increases beyond best glide, your glide angle gets steeper. Say you are flying at best glide, you are looking through a specific point in ...
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  • 123
1 vote
1 answer
231 views

Database for NACA airfoil polars [closed]

Is there anywhere where I can find a database of experimental or CFD-obtained NACA series four or series 6 airfoil data? I'd like to have access to a relatively large set of high-fidelity drag polars/$...
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2 votes
2 answers
182 views

Do the polar curves have large differences in takeoff than in landing?

I was wondering if the polar curve has differences in the takeoff due to the smaller extension of the flaps (this is half that in the landing) that changes the AOA for $ C_ {la} = 0 $. In addition, ...
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4 votes
1 answer
228 views

How do I calculate new minimal speed for a glider when I put water into the tank?

Lets say a glider weights 400kg and has a minimal speed of 70km/h. When it has additionally 100l water, so in total 500kg, what is the new minimal speed? I would argue, that in order to reach the ...
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  • 241
1 vote
1 answer
848 views

Why is polar curve of a glider dependent on flight load?

This is my first question here. I'm just a glider in education phase and not yet a pilot, but because I'm also physicist, I'm interested in some details more than other people. My question is simple:...
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  • 241
1 vote
1 answer
235 views

What does "E" stand for in a polar curve?

In the following polar curve, there is a symbol "E" with the number 33.5 next to it. What does this mean?
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