Questions tagged [airliner]

An airliner is a large, commercial aircraft operated by an airline for transporting people and/or cargo.

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For a given mileage, which is more profitable, multiple short flights or fewer long flights?

In a simplified scenario, which is more profitable for an airline, operating 10 short flights (400 miles) or 5 long flights (800 miles), for a total of 4,000 miles flown in each case? To make things ...
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How much fuel can be saved in a half full of passengers plane?

On a typical airliner (let's say A320 / B737 / or similar), comparing a plane full of passengers vs one half full, how much fuel an airline can save on a trip when the plane is only half full? (This ...
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Optimising Continuous Descent Approaches (CDA): Seeking Strategies and Rules of Thumb

Ideally, approaches should be executed as a continuous descent approach (CDA), maintaining idle thrust and only levelling off (or reducing vertical speed to <500 fpm) briefly to reduce speed, while ...
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How Long Will Boeing Keep the 737 in Production? [closed]

Due to the immense costs involved in the certification of a new type, Boeing has continued to iterate upon the initial 737 type with the most recent models being the 737 NG and MAX. Will they continue ...
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Cruise with a single engine in a twin, good idea?

Airlines are looking to lower costs every single day. I wonder if it makes economic sense (fuel costs) to operate a airliner using only one engine during cruise, while keeping the second engine at ...
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Statistics: is being a crew on airliners overall roughly as dangerous as driving daily?

The question says it all. It's a commonplace that "airliner travel" for passengers is far and away the safest travel, on almost any metric (per mile, hour, per human-year, etc). However, I'...
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Could the radar on a passenger plane be used as a makeshift AWACS?

I'm aware that an airliner doesn't have a way to transmit data over datalink, but could an airliner at least tell other aircraft what they see on radar? Is an airliners radar powerful enough? (Source ...
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Why there is only Boeing and Airbus?

Amidst all these new scandals with Boeing and unbelievable/disgusting safety situations like the example of the hidden camera report long time ago, and knowing that airlines only have Boeing or ...
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Why are British Airways wings so dirty?

I often fly through Heathrow, and British Airways airplanes, particularly their 777s, always look so dirty. For example, there is often a kind of dark oily stain on the wings and flight surface. So - ...
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How valuable is CFI hours outside USA?

CFI serves as an excellent pathway to the airline industry. However, if I don't have the necessary paperwork to remain in the US and work, how does accumulating 1500 hours in single-engine aircraft ...
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Could an passenger jet perform a complete power down & up IN FLIGHT? [duplicate]

I've read various references that it is not uncommon that modern passenger jets' computer systems need an occasional reboot to fix some erratic state. Of course, that is done on the ground and ...
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How much of the empty mass of a typical airliner consists of rivets?

How much of the dry mass of a typical airliner (let's say a Boeing 737 or Airbus A320, if a particular model is needed) consists of rivets used in assembling the plane?
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Why are many parts of an airliner required to be triplicated, but not the "parts" most likely to malfunction (i.e., the pilots)?

Many components of airliners are installed with three redundant systems to reduce the risk of equipment failure causing accidents. However, there are only two of the "components" most likely ...
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What department does an airline pilot fall under?

On LinkedIn, I saw on the Page for the Harry Reid International Airport there were charts for 346 members, 157 of them working in Operations, 43 for Administrative, 37 for Business Development, 25 for ...
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How does drag change efficient cruise conditions?

If I have an aircraft, and I reduce the induced drag produced by it, does this mean I should operate it at a higher altitude and faster speed to take advantage of the drop in total drag, or slower at ...
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Do airliners respond to mild turbulence in real time?

I've always been fascinated with the impact of ailerons on an aircraft's trajectory; from what I have seen sitting by a wing is that the slightest movement can bank the aircraft quite significantly. ...
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What would be the range of a cargo 777 full of usable fuel up to MTOW?

Having read about Rutan's Voyager and more recently about Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer I wondered how would some modern long haul airliner such as a cargo Boeing777 (or other airliner) perform at this ...
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When riding in the flight deck of a large airplane, why does it appear that the airplane moves slowly?

I recently rode in the jumpseat of an A330, and on approach, the visual impression of speed is very different from that of a small airplane or flight simulator. Specifically, it appears that the ...
Charles Nicholson's user avatar
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Has an airline passenger ever in some way prevented a crash?

Have there been any incidents in which an airliner would almost certainly have crashed had a passenger not taken some action (most likely telling a flight attendant that something didn't seem right)?
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Why aren't PFDs made as robust as the Integrated Standby Instrument System (ISIS)?

The integrated standby instrument system (ISIS) is a standby instrument used in many large airliners that provides airspeed, altitude, and attitude information to the pilot in the case of electrical ...
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Is an autopilot failure an emergency?

If the autopilot of an airliner fails, but everything else still works, weather conditions are good, and the pilots are able to hand-fly the plane with no problems, is this an emergency? Would they ...
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Can we see evidence of "crabbing" when viewing contrails?

Can we see evidence of "crabbing" when viewing an aircraft leaving a contrail? Such as, in the form of an angular misalignment between the longitudinal axis of the aircraft (i.e. the ...
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Why do some aircraft's flight control surfaces not droop when hydraulic power is taken away? [duplicate]

Analyzing a bunch of different photos of airliners sitting at Gates, I've noticed that some have flight controls that droop (due to no hydraulic power) and sometimes they stay leveled. Why is this? ...
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Can someone help me understand this aerofoil?

I came across this morphing aerofoil, but don’t understand how it works please? Can someone explain also what the components are, like that box in the left? I looked into that reference, but it’s a ...
Warrick's user avatar
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Can a commercial aircraft fly at night with complete navigation and communication equipment failure?

Disclaimer: I know there are numerous redundancies and the complete failure of navigation and communication system may not be possible. Hence, let's approach this question as a pure thought experiment....
Arpit Tyagi's user avatar
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Are landing gear bay doors meant to help high lift devices at producing lift, when gear is extended, regarding airliners?

Watching some video of one Mig-31 taking off, one can see those doors circled in red in the picture sourced from it, are those meant to produce net lift and reduce take off and landing distance/speed? ...
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What causes a jet airliner (with a yaw damper) to roll toward the "weaker" engine during an asymmetrical thrust condition?

Please help me better understand what causes a jet airliner (such as the Boeing 737-500) to roll toward the "weaker" engine when power is reduced on one side. Such as in the situations ...
quiet flyer's user avatar
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How often do airline pilots actually have to avoid other aircraft that ATC did not tell them about at cruise altitude?

I know any pilot flying in VMC, whether under VFR or IFR, must "see and avoid." How often do airline pilots actually "see" and have to "avoid" other traffic at cruise ...
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Do El Al Israel aircraft have Chaff/Flare dispensers and Radar Warning Receivers?

I have heard that El Al Israel aircraft have missile warning systems and lasers to stop anti-aircraft weapons. Do El Al Israel aircraft have chaff/flare dispensers and Radar Warning Receiver (RWR) too?...
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Why are the trailing edges of wings not always made as 'sharp' as possible?

I noticed that wing trailing edges of new airliners like A220 (CSeries) are not completely sharp. Instead, they are blunt. I always thought that the sharper the better in subsonic flow. What is the ...
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Making sailplane go faster

Sailplanes have much higher L/D than jetliners. But they are three times slower. Is it practical to make a vanilla sailplane glide at 600mph by lifting it to a ridiculous altitude? If so, what would ...
Abdullah is not an Amalekite's user avatar
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Why do the wings in these pictures go from swept back to parallel with the airflow? [duplicate]

To better understand my question, look at this A320 below As you can see, the wing becomes parallel with the airflow at the wing root. Same thing on this 737 But this is not found on bigger planes ...
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Are airliners designed to land safely with no undercarriage deployed?

Complete undercarriage failure ("belly landing") is very rare in large passenger aircraft, but not unprecedented. (source) I would imagine it would be fairly easy to predict which part of ...
Party Ark's user avatar
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What long-range jet is easiest to fly?

Of jet aircraft with sufficient range to cross the Atlantic on a full tank of fuel, which is easiest to fly? More specifically: The required range is from New York's JFK Airport, to Shannon Airport, ...
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Would a Cessna 172 be as safe as an airliner if flown by an airline pilot?

I know that general-aviation flight is much more dangerous than airline flight. Is this because of the planes or the pilots? If an airline pilot is flying a Cessna 172, is that Cessna as safe as an ...
Someone's user avatar
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2 votes
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COMAC C919 engine

COMAC C919 has been dubbed as one of the biggest successes in the Chinese aviation industry as this is the first narrow-body airliner capable of long-distance flight. This is important for China as ...
user366312's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
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What odd maneuver is this for a cruising airplane?

Several years ago, I saw a set 4-5 of con-trails converging at nearly the same time and height. They were each executing large turns (90 to 300 degrees) over the same space, starting from various ...
user1745937's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is considered a positive rate?

I'm a beginner pilot, and i am trying to perfect my takeoff. What vertical speed is considered a positive rate in a Boeing 747? Thanks in Advance
JoshThePilot's user avatar
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How exactly does the cabin pressure of an airliner change during ascent and descent?

At cruise altitude, airliners' cabin altitudes are usually at 6000-8000 ft, but how and when does it get there respectively how does it behave from ground until cruise altitude? Is the cabin ...
Giovanni's user avatar
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Safety factor in airliner design

I am currently working on a baseline configuration and initial sizing for a conventional airliner with 90 passengers. The FAA states that an average passenger weighs approx. 80kg. When calculating my ...
Shapol01's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
566 views

Could a F-22's exhaust stall a highjacked Boeing 767's turbofan(s) and force it to land?

Would it be possible to use a F-22's exhaust to intentionally stall a hijacked Boeing 767's turbofan engines in order to force it to land instead of shooting it down? The idea being that stalling one ...
Kim deDonado's user avatar
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2 answers
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Are dual input situations for major aircraft quite unusual?

Why would the Captain and Co-pilot both need to control the plane at the same time in normal operations? The only time that I could think of one is manually flying and doing complex maneuvering and ...
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25 votes
3 answers
13k views

Why is waste water from lavatory sinks dumped outside in mid-flight?

I learned that the waste water from the lavatory sink in most commercial airliners is dumped outside the aircraft while in flight. Is this really the case? If so, why is the waste water dumped outside ...
Flux's user avatar
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Under which circumstances were 727s or 737s used for long-haul flights?

I've been intrigued by the occasional picture of a 727 crossing the Atlantic, like this Air France in Miami from the late 1960s. Under which circumstances would such narrow-body aircrafts (most ...
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10 votes
1 answer
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What jet is pictured on the FAA pilot certificate?

The front of the FAA pilot certificate shows two aircraft. One is the Wright Flyer. The other appears to be a 2 or 3 engine commercial jet. What model of aircraft is that jet? The engines look ...
BlueRonin's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
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Why increase chord length for supersonic aircraft (swept vs delta wings)?

TL/DR For supersonic transport and a given sweep angle, why are delta wings used instead of swept wings? If you write the drag equations, a sweep of $55^{\circ}$ seems sufficient with no modification ...
Nate Poon's user avatar
-5 votes
2 answers
277 views

If you are in a terrain escape maneuver, would you be able to see traffic above you displayed in the cockpit of airliners [closed]

nayed If you are in a terrain escape maneuver, would you be able to see traffic above you in the cockpit of big airliners
Yosef Jabbour's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
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A very loud, short- lived howl

Within the last eighteen months, I'd say - commercial aircraft descending into Heathrow have started to emit a terrifying, short-lived but very loud whining howl when they pass over my house. They are ...
Tim Staffell's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why is this commercial plane making this manoeuvre?

The plane going in circles above my head for an hour now, what could it be?
Sahil's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can flaps on Airbus/Boeing airliners be deployed at high speeds during cruise, still?

Brief Background of the Incident Mayday Season 22 Features an Episode "Terror over Michigan" (Episode 6) based on the events of TWA Flight 841. The Episode revolves around a Boeing 727 ...
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