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After flying many years for a major airline I am faced with the task of estimating my night time and cross country time. I have over 16,000 hours. I need this information for my resume as I am planning to fly past 65 years of age after flying with a part 121 carrier. My company online flight log does no break out night time and cross country time.

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    $\begingroup$ Any Part 135 company should realize that you have quite a bit of night and cross country time based on the number of hours flown at a 121 airline. I wouldn't worry about tying to estimate anything. $\endgroup$
    – wbeard52
    Jun 17, 2023 at 16:14
  • $\begingroup$ @wbeard52 In my experience, even after a long career and many thousands of hours, the insurance company for any commercial operation (part 125, 135, 91K, etc.) requires this info. Leaving it blank is not an option. $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Jun 17, 2023 at 16:42
  • $\begingroup$ I would just make an educated guess, with a conservative number that makes sense, and put that in my CV, possibly with "estimated". If an employer asks, explain the truth. I would expect that unless you are a freight dog it's probably 8:1 day/night. Or poll your mates who do record that those numbers, average them, and use that. Nobody's going to audit your log book. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Jun 17, 2023 at 18:01

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There is no Federal Aviation Regulation that provides for estimating flight time or specific types of flight time like night or cross-country.

There is guidance Here for FAA Inspectors to use with respect to lost pilot logbooks. However, I don't believe this particular guidance will provide you with useful information on how to estimate your night or cross-country flight time based on the specifics outlined in your question.

Undoubtedly, you are not in need of flight time in order to meet a specific pilot aeronautical experience requirement for a certificate or rating.

If I were in your situation, I would likely complete my resume similar to what you have said in your question and note that you are making a reasonable estimate regarding the night and cross-country flight time that is included in your total time of 16,000 hours.

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    $\begingroup$ Doesn't everything flown for Part 121 qualify as XC? $\endgroup$
    – Ralph J
    Jun 18, 2023 at 4:48
  • $\begingroup$ @RalphJ I would agree with that if using the XC definition in Part 61 (there is not a XC definition in Part 1 or Part 121). Unless the F/O had only a commercial certificate (prior to the rule change) and was accruing XC time to reach the ATP required 500 hours of XC (or getting the R-ATP restriction removed for an F/O with only 200 hrs. of XC) and there was a leg less than 50 nm in length. Not an impossible circumstance. (ATRs, Dash 8's, etc., remote areas). $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Jun 18, 2023 at 18:21

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