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Trying to find the VFR communication failure procedure in EASA, but can't find anything clear enough, maybe someone have a link for clear instructions for that procedure?

I want to figure out what should I do in case of comm failure under VFR rules when -

  • I am in uncontrolled airspace? (G or vfr in E - controlled but communication not required) can I continue my flight? As I am not required to have two way communication (at least in the Czech Republic) and just somehow deal with the destination airport? Or should I land ASAP ?

  • What should I do if I am crossing controlled airspace? Continue with my clearance? Or leave the controlled airspace asap?

  • In case of flight into a controlled airport and communication failure just before the traffic Circuit, what to do? Continue to the circuit and hope someone will understand that I am without a radio and use lights?

I checked all the VFR manuals I found but didn't find any clear instructions, just "squak 7600 and land in the nearest suitable airfield" but it feel too simplified for me...

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  • $\begingroup$ Closely related: aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/3794/… $\endgroup$
    – Jamiec
    Mar 6, 2023 at 8:33
  • $\begingroup$ @Jamiec, thanks! but from what I see in the answer it's related to the FAA, I believe that there should be some differences between the FAA procedures and the EASA ones, am I wrong ? $\endgroup$ Mar 6, 2023 at 8:40
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    $\begingroup$ I don't think they're materially different. I wrote that answer with reference to an FAA publications but I fly in the UK and would follow much the same procedures (even though we're no longer EASA!) $\endgroup$
    – Jamiec
    Mar 6, 2023 at 8:42
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    $\begingroup$ Much of that answer was also written with reference to cfinotebook.net/notebook/flight-hazards-and-safety/… $\endgroup$
    – Jamiec
    Mar 6, 2023 at 8:49
  • $\begingroup$ Surely it matters what sort of controlled airspace you are in? Certainly it does in the US, there's a lot of controlled airspace (namely Class E) that you can fly in VFR without talking to anyone. Question strikes me as being overly broad-- but maybe it wouldn't to someone more familiar with EASA-- ?? $\endgroup$ Mar 6, 2023 at 9:59

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