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I'm currently going through some airline selections in Europe for which it is common to fly 45 mins PF and 45 mins as PM during the assessment. I'm wondering how I am, if at all, supposed to log this time. Only PF or both? I'm well aware that this time does not count towards my total time or flight time or instrument time.

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In general, you can write whatever you want in your logbook; if you want to record being a passenger on a 777 from London to New York, go ahead. What's important is that you only claim what's allowed to be claimed for a particular purpose. So if you are applying for a license that requires XXX hours of PIC, then that 777 flight shouldn't be included in that total.

In order to keep logbooks "clean" and free of entries that will generally be ignored, pilots generally wouldn't log passenger time in the same book that they record actual flight time. (Yes, the 777 passenger example is an exaggeration, to make a point.) Unless you foresee a circumstance when time in an FTD, not associated with any training syllabus, would count toward something, the most common practice would probably be to omit it entirely from your logbook. (If you were in a training program that requires a given amount of time in an FTD, that's a separate case, since then the FTD time would count toward meeting that program requirement.)

Alternatively, you could enter the event in your logbook, but with 0:00 in all columns, and your actual duration as a remark. That way you'd have a reference that you spent X:XX in the FTD on that date, but nothing gets added to any of your flight times that could be questioned or, worse, mistakenly added, later.

The consequences of having been found to be inflating your flying times, even innocently, can be unpleasant, so the best practice would be to keep separate the times that count (PIC, SIC, student, XC, actual IMC, etc) from those that don't count and are only of interest to you.

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