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Does anybody know the exact name of the color that was used to paint all Cold War era Soviet fighter cockpits? It’s a blue green color but I’d like to get the exact color as I’m currently building a model of a Soviet fighter. I need to paint the cockpit.

The image below is of a MiG-23 cockpit for reference.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ How a color is defined or represented is an extremely deep rabbit hole and there is no simple answer. Even the Soviets/Russians probably mixed some blue and green and said "good enough". If you're only interested in painting a model, maybe this product (which I found by googling, no affiliation) is suitable for you? $\endgroup$ Feb 6, 2023 at 3:20
  • $\begingroup$ To my eyes, on my monitors, this looks close to Pantone 325. YMMV. Even with that I didn't see a close match in the Humbrol Shade Chart, which also lists Tamiya and other popular brand equivalents. $\endgroup$ Feb 6, 2023 at 13:30
  • $\begingroup$ I have seen the color described as "Russian Turquoise Green." It reminds me of that very special shade of baby poop green. 🤣 $\endgroup$ Feb 8, 2023 at 0:32

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According to this model color chart, Mig uses a turquoise shade for cockpit interiors:

enter image description here

CMYK (54%, 0%, 10%, 43%), which corresponds roughly to the hue of Pantone 10297 coated:

enter image description here

However we don't know how this color chart was designed, nor whether the color was sampled from an actual aircraft or a photo.


Color is a complex matter, specially when trying to compare an image from a file with a reference:

  • Unless the image is captured and processed with a chain of tools working according to accurate embedded ICC color profiles, the resulting colors are actually variable. To start with most online images don't embed the color profile used for the final step, thus the same color is not guaranteed to be the same in the final file.

  • Consumer displays aren't really faithful, comparing colors on a screen with colors on a physical support results in differences, often important ones.

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