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Typically Autogyros experiencing "negative Gs" will crash.

I wonder if an Autogyro with wings would work as a fail safe for this situation? Would it allow the pilot to recover assuming this have enough height stall?

Autogyro with wings

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  • $\begingroup$ Related: aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/49865/… $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 21, 2023 at 14:04
  • $\begingroup$ It would only work if the wings provided enough lift to allow a controlled descent after the rotors had stopped. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 21, 2023 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ Honestly, it looks like just two more things for the rotor blades to collide with. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 21, 2023 at 23:44
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    $\begingroup$ An autogyro with wing is an airplane with an useless rotor on top of it 🙃 $\endgroup$
    – sophit
    Commented Jan 24, 2023 at 16:04

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Maybe. A big issue with a negative-g situation in an autogyro is loss of longitudinal control caused by the loss of drag on the rotor. The rotor drag provides a lot of nose-up moment, and the loss of it can cause the autogyro to flip. This makes recovery essentially impossible.

Wings positioned near the center of gravity provide relatively small longitudinal moments. They may help (if they are mounted forward of the center of gravity and so produce nose-up moment), but it is unlikely to be enough. A tailplane, on the other hand, might give enough nose-up moment to keep the autogyro from flipping over. The wings could also be helpful for roll control, especially if they are equipped with ailerons.

With sufficient altitude, if the autogyro can be kept under control it should be possible to get the rotor RPM back up and resume normal flight.

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Given sufficient altitude, a stalled autogyro should be able to enter autoration and land safely in the same way as a helicopter.

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  • $\begingroup$ After a negative-G incident, the rotor rarely stays in one piece... $\endgroup$
    – xxavier
    Commented Jun 23, 2023 at 15:20

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