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This is the second example of the biplanes they flew.

Can anyone identify this biplane flown by the 476th pursuit squadron "The Black Falcons" of the 322rd pursuit group of the Army Air Reserve stationed at Clover Field, Santa Monica, California in the mid to late 1920's? enter image description here

I did some looking could this biplane be a Consolidated PT-3?

The palm tree looking things is the Black Falcons Emblem not part of the aircraft. See this link. Third photo down https://thejivebombers.com/2018/01/23/486/

The struts on the left in the photo show a diagonal strut going to the rear of the upper wing. This is what made me think it might be a Consolidated PT.

I agree that the falcon is wearing a falconry hood. The ornament on top of the image is part of the hood. The hood covers the falcons eyes.

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    $\begingroup$ The one in the linked pic is a Jenny. This one isn't a Jenny, although it appears to have the same engine, an OX-5 V8. The splayed cabane struts suggest a Waco product. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Commented Sep 23, 2022 at 12:53
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    $\begingroup$ Hi Bill, it seems you created two separate accounts: this one and this one. See I accidentally created two accounts; how do I merge them? on how to merge them. $\endgroup$
    – Bianfable
    Commented Sep 24, 2022 at 9:58
  • $\begingroup$ Consolidated PT-3 has a radial engine, the biplane in the picture has an upright V engine. I don't understand the palm tree shaped thing and the black circle in place of the nose cone. $\endgroup$
    – user21228
    Commented Sep 24, 2022 at 12:08
  • $\begingroup$ The engine looks like it has three cylinder banks (W engine), but the angles between them (45°) are unlike those of the Napier Lion. $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 24, 2022 at 13:37
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    $\begingroup$ @quietflyer great find it definitely is more probable to display a falconry hood than a palm tree, even if this planes were more likely to carry coconuts than reach 300km/h in a dive $\endgroup$
    – user21228
    Commented Oct 3, 2022 at 11:26

1 Answer 1

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It looks like a Consolidated PT-1 Trusty, powered by a V8 Hispano-Suiza.

enter image description here

(source)

enter image description here

(source)

Most evident clue is this document found by user @Freeman explicitly stating the PT-1 was used. Other similitudes with OP image are:

  1. flat mid-upper wing segment, dihedral starting at root of outer wing.
  2. upper-wing opening shape above cockpit
  3. ailerons location spanwise
  4. tubular struts and wiring setup
  5. engine
  6. propeller leading edge circled pattern

This thing circled in red does not look like it is part of the plane, rather it is a panel or painted cardboard representing a logo, that hides the propeller's hub and radiator.

enter image description here

enter image description here

(Wright-Hispano V8)

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  • $\begingroup$ Different airplane. The one the OP posted has a radial engine. $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 30, 2022 at 18:22
  • $\begingroup$ @JuanJimenez a radial would be radially symmetric, this one has axial symmetry $\endgroup$
    – user21228
    Commented Sep 30, 2022 at 23:03
  • $\begingroup$ Ah, I see it now. What i thought were cylinders are actually valve covers. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 0:11
  • $\begingroup$ not sure about it but i think the thing at 12o'clock with "1" paint on it may be a gravity fed oil tank. It sits in front of intake manifolds. it may also be something else related to the radiator. $\endgroup$
    – user21228
    Commented Oct 2, 2022 at 12:35

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