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I was wondering if there is any regulation, EASA or ICAO, in other words “where does it say” that SIM hours need to be in your logbook? I’ve never recorded those, I’m going to try and upgrade my CPL to an ATP and once before I heard one guy wondering about those whilst going through my logbook. I have over 4000 hrs on the A320 family(yes, I took my time with the ATPL, it’s shameful, I know), so I have plenty of hours: cross-country, night, PICUS, all of those. But the SIM hours… Regarding evidence of training - the local authority have my file with all my records, they’ve been issuing and reissuing my licence from the very begining of my flying days. So they do have proof and can see for themselves that I have been properly trained and I have been current since I got my type rating. I would be willing to argue about those SIM hours missing from my logbook, but I’m not sure weather I had any ground. Thank you.

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    $\begingroup$ I can't speak for EASA. In the US, there is no requirement that simulator hours are logged. However, if you are going to use those simulator hours towards a rating, they must meet 2 conditions. They (a) must have been performed in an approved simulator that meets the required BATD/AATD standards, and (b) must be recorded by "a reliable method" either in a paper or electronic logbook. Your instructor verifies your logbook when they endorse you for the check ride, and the DPE again verifies them during the check ride. You would never be permitted to claim unrecorded hours in the US. $\endgroup$
    – Max R
    Sep 20, 2022 at 22:09
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. That is one of the reasons I was asking - I don’t need to use those hours for anything, I have plenty of real ones. $\endgroup$
    – Marijus
    Sep 21, 2022 at 6:02

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You only need to log hours that you plan to use for some purpose: currency, meeting requirements for a rating, or something similar. There's no general (*) requirement that you have everything logged where you can get in trouble for not having logged some event -- in the sim or the aircraft.

The (*) on that statement comes when regulations limit how much flying one can perform in a specified period (last 7 days, last 28 days, last 360 days, a calendar month, a calendar year, etc). In that case, you or somebody does have to log your flights, so that you or your airline can demonstrate that you aren't exceeding any limit. That's something that airlines tend to track very carefully, and it's not left to the pilot alone. And, in any case, the limits on flight hours and Flight Duty Period (USA - FAR Part 117) apply to actual flight hours, not simulator hours. (Yes, hours spent in the sim are hours on duty and not in rest, but classroom time is also, and as long as the scheduling system shows adequate periods of rest, nobody cares, from a crew rest/crew duty standpoint, what fraction of the day was spent in the sim vs in the briefing room.)

If you don't need the sim hours, there's no need to reconstruct them.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. I hope hope our local CAA will see it the same way. $\endgroup$
    – Marijus
    Sep 21, 2022 at 7:53

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