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I've been intrigued by the occasional picture of a 727 crossing the Atlantic, like this Air France in Miami from the late 1960s. Under which circumstances would such narrow-body aircrafts (most notably 727s and 737s, or even A319s and A320s) be used for long-haul, intercontinental flights?

PS: I'm referring to "regular" (e.g., flag) carriers, not private/cargo jets.

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If you have what is called a long thin route, then a narrow body is ideally suited. The better example of this is the B757. The new A321XLR adds nearly 2000 km to the range of the A321, up to 8,700km! This will make transatlantic flights between smaller cities on both sides much more common. If it is not immediately obvious, a long thin route is a city pair route that is a relatively speaking long distance, and also does not have the demand for one or more daily B747 or A380 flights (thin = not much demand). It does not mean ultra long range, where an A350 or equivalent would be needed (project sunrise in Australia, for example). These could be both business or tourist routes.

I should also add that the B727-200 would not have been able to fly the distance from France to Miami non-stop. Looking into this, it is a flight from the French territories in the Caribbean (Pointe-à-Pitre).

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