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Just wondering (especially in the rain) if an airplanes rear wheels will spin like a cars rear tyres will spin when it accelerates from a halt.

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    $\begingroup$ The wheels are not powered like a car. They provide no motive force. $\endgroup$
    – WPNSGuy
    Aug 5 at 23:13
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    $\begingroup$ Ok. Sorry if it sounds like a stupid question im not a huge aviation guy lol, appreciate the answer tho thank you :) $\endgroup$
    – kofi
    Aug 5 at 23:18
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    $\begingroup$ If an airplane was on a treadmill... $\endgroup$ Aug 6 at 1:50
  • $\begingroup$ @MichaelHall - Too funny $\endgroup$
    – Jim
    Aug 6 at 5:51
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    $\begingroup$ I believe there have been experiments in driving the main gear wheels in the past, either to help planes accelerate at the start of TO, or to give the ability to taxi without actual engine thrust, but the benefits weren't worth the weight/complexity. Keep in mind that weight is Priority One in design when it comes to airplanes, and extreme measures are often taken to keep weight down, like using exotic materials that no car designer in his right mind would use, or making seemingly trivial choices between fastener A or B based on some microscopic weight difference that adds up to a few pounds. $\endgroup$
    – John K
    Aug 6 at 19:49

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No, the tires on a plane aren't driven by the engine. All the power comes from the propeller/turbine pushing on the air.

Well, actually, there have been a (very) few experimental or one-off planes with driven wheels. But even then, the vast majority of them had wheels that were driven by low-power electric motors without enough torque to actually "burn rubber". Those motors wouldn't have been used for takeoff, just as a more fuel-efficient way to taxi around the airport.

If the brakes are dragging, it is entirely possible for it to skid "the other way": i.e. with the engine pulling the airframe forward while the tire doesn't rotate. But that's about it.

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The airplanes obtain their forward momentum from a force called thrust, in most planes it comes from either a propeller that have airflow deflection or a turbine engines that blows air due to ignition.

The only time when the gear is rolling is after takeoff and it's stopped by pressing the brakes.

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