0
$\begingroup$

Who gives us transition level when it varies?

ATC, ATIS, any others?

$\endgroup$

2 Answers 2

2
$\begingroup$

Check the country's AIP, ENR section.

ATIS, ATC or FIS is a good bet otherwise but it remains a bet.

In some EASA countries, you can calculate it yourself if the Transition altitude is fixed. E.g. Germany's TA is 5000ft, with the transition layer a minimum of 1000 ft. So with a QNH of 1014 the TL will be FL60, 978-1013 it'll be FL70 and 977- will be FL80. Others are different but they don't hide the information, it's in the AIP.

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by ENR section? Ok great mate, so you bet as in you are sure? So ATIS,ATC and FIS...Isn't transition altitude always fixed or known so to say...so you can always find transition level...but I know that some countires have a transition layer big enough like 2000 ft thay they fix the transorion level.... $\endgroup$ Jun 12, 2022 at 6:00
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not a betting man, I like to be sure so I read the AIP of the country I fly over or through. Every AIP has a number of sections, e.g. AD for the Aerodrome info and ENR for enroute. Here's e.g. Belgium's Transition Altitude and Level: ops.skeyes.be/html/belgocontrol_static/eaip/eAIP_Main/html/eAIP/… Or here's how the UK works: nats-uk.ead-it.com/cms-nats/opencms/en/Publications/AIP/… $\endgroup$ Jun 13, 2022 at 13:45
  • $\begingroup$ Great mate, very kind.Amazing✈✈😘😘❣❣ $\endgroup$ Jun 14, 2022 at 17:18
  • $\begingroup$ @YosefJabbour Glad it helped. Please accept an answer to mark this as answered. $\endgroup$ Jun 16, 2022 at 20:04
0
$\begingroup$

Usually ATIS, or the atc which first clears you to an altitude if there is no ATIS. In some cases (e.g US) it is fixed so there is no need for it to be given. In those cases its usually charted in the arrival/approach chart.

$\endgroup$
8
  • $\begingroup$ What is the transition level in the us? Also why is it fixed? Isn't the value of transition level dependent on qnh = local pressure conditions...( some countries fix the tranaition level if the transition layer distance is large...) $\endgroup$ Jun 12, 2022 at 5:56
  • $\begingroup$ So is the Transition Level in the US fixed to FL200? What happens if the QNG drops below 977? The vertical separation between aircraft cruising at 18.000ft and at FL200 would be only 970ft or even less with lower air pressure? $\endgroup$
    – pcfreakxx
    Jun 12, 2022 at 8:48
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @pcfreakxx In the US, the lowest usable flight level is FL180, FL190 or FL200 depending on QNH to ensure 1000 ft separation with 17,000 ft (SKYbrary). $\endgroup$
    – Bianfable
    Jun 12, 2022 at 9:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Bianfable Thanks for your explanation! I was falsely assuming the TA was 18.000ft in the US. But having a TA of 17.000ft and variable TRL of FL180-FL200 makes perfectly sense. It’s the same here in Germany, although with different values (TA 5.000ft, TRL: FL60-80). $\endgroup$
    – pcfreakxx
    Jun 12, 2022 at 11:02
  • $\begingroup$ @pcfreakxx Technically TA is at 18,000 ft in the US. It's just not the highest usable altitude (unlike in Europe). $\endgroup$
    – Bianfable
    Jun 12, 2022 at 11:43

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .