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As far as I can tell, the only VFR Corridor (see AIM 3-5-5(b)) that exists is in San Diego. Is that correct or are there others elsewhere in the US?

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    $\begingroup$ There are only so many Bravo airspaces in the US. Why don't you take a look at them, then come back and answer your own question? (That's allowed and encouraged!) $\endgroup$
    – randomhead
    Mar 10, 2022 at 16:46
  • $\begingroup$ Take a look at LAX, SFO and Seattle. They all have VFR transition corridors. Details about these are on supplemental or “ FLY” charts $\endgroup$ Mar 10, 2022 at 17:34
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to aviation.SE! This question has some related information. $\endgroup$
    – Pondlife
    Mar 10, 2022 at 18:29
  • $\begingroup$ @StephenS: A "VFR Corridor" is a specifically defined "Other Airspace Area" as described in para. 3-5-5 of the AIM. Different specifically defined "Other Airspace Areas" (e.g., VFR Flyways, VFR Transition Routes, VFR Corridors, SFARs) are sometimes inadvertantly and incorrectly referred to as a group using generic terms such as VFR Corridors. But each of the various specifically designed "Other Airspace Areas" have different rules, procedures, etc. $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Mar 11, 2022 at 3:37
  • $\begingroup$ @757toga Thanks! $\endgroup$
    – StephenS
    Mar 11, 2022 at 3:41

1 Answer 1

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San Diego is the only location that has a "VFR Corridor" that I can find. There may be others, but I've looked at many of the main Class B airspace areas (San Francisco, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Phoenix) and they do not have "VFR Corridors." It is likely that there used to be more "VFR Corridors," but have since become SFAR airspace (see 14 CFR Part 93) for more information.

Also, if you do a word search in FAA JO Order 7400.11F, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, which provides a list and the dimensions of all Class B Airspace areas, you will find that the only Class B showing a "VFR Corridor" is within the San Diego Class B (see page B-61, Area L).

Operation within "VFR Corridors" like in San Diego do not require communication with, or authorization from, ATC.

Los Angeles, for example, has several "VFR Transition Routes" all of which require an ATC clearance. However, Los Angeles also has a "Special Flight Rules Area" (SFRA) route that, if flown as required using the rules shown on the chart, does not require ATC authorization (conducted in accordance with FAR 93.95).

Some Class B airspace areas have "VFR Flyways" (avoiding, but near, Class B airspace) and do not require an ATC clearance.

So, of course, review the Terminal Area Chart for the area in which you plan to fly near, in or over Class B airspace for the specific rules that may apply to you.

Here is a link to Section 5. Other Airspace Areas in the Aeronautical Information Manual. See specifically paragraph 3-5-5, "Published VFR Routes" that provides additional pertinent information.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks very much for confirming what I was finding. I agree, they have probably been transitioned to SFRAs (I know San Francisco use to have a corridor). I appreciate the information! $\endgroup$
    – Claudia
    Mar 10, 2022 at 18:50
  • $\begingroup$ ATC manual 3-5-5(a-c), which you mentioned, even gives some reason/history/rationale: "The design of a few of the first Class B airspace areas provided a corridor for the passage of uncontrolled traffic.... Because of the heavy traffic volume and the procedures necessary to efficiently manage the flow of traffic, it has not been possible to incorporate VFR corridors in the development or modifications of Class B airspace in recent years." $\endgroup$ Mar 10, 2022 at 19:22
  • $\begingroup$ I think there is still one along the Hudson in New York $\endgroup$
    – Jim
    Mar 10, 2022 at 21:33
  • $\begingroup$ @JIM The one in NY is an SFRA $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Mar 10, 2022 at 21:39
  • $\begingroup$ Oops. I guess you’re right. $\endgroup$
    – Jim
    Mar 10, 2022 at 21:42

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