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This seems to be a standard question but at least two of us should know, cannot find a definitive source, CAP393 seems not to have any text that refers. Any help gratefully received.

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    $\begingroup$ Please clarify. Are you trying to ask if the glider is considered to be "in flight" when the wheel is rolling along the ground during takeoff and landing? Or perhaps, when the towline is connected and the towplane is taking up slack? And "in flight" for what purpose? For logging time in the pilot's logbook and the glider's logbook? For the purpose of certain regulations? It's kind of hard to imagine what your intent for the question is-- please help us out a little by clarifying-- $\endgroup$ Jan 13 at 13:41
  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking. $\endgroup$
    – Community Bot
    Jan 13 at 19:03
  • $\begingroup$ @nrbray - (reposted to add another thought) -- even if you've gotten the information you need, the rest of us are curious as to why you need it. When would anyone need to know what the Air Navigation order has to say about when a glider is or is not in "flight"? Potential test question? Guidance for filling out logbook? Potentially pertains to right-of-way rules? Could pertain to when nav lights would be required, if landing near sunset? Or perhaps when a non-pilot passenger could be legally allowed to manipulate controls? Just curious, please add a few words more to your question $\endgroup$ Jan 14 at 3:03
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See the Air Navigation Order 2016, Part 1, Chapter 1, Article 3(b).

An aircraft is deemed to be in flight—
(a)...
(b) in the case of a pilotless flying machine, or a glider, from the moment when it first moves for the purpose of taking off, until the moment when it next comes to rest after landing.

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It's been a long time, but if I remember rightly (for logging purposes at least) a flight starts when the aircraft "first moves for the purpose of flight" and ends when it "comes to a final rest after flight". For a powered plane that is from start of taxi to end of taxi.

Applying this, a glider would start its flight when it starts to roll on the tow/launch, and ends when it stops at the end of the landing run.

I'm afraid I have no references, and I'll delete this if someone contradicts me.

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