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Can anyone explain how the waypoint ULURU near Sandspit, BC Latitude 53° 6' 1.00" N Longitude 131° 38' 13.00" W was named, when Uluru is a very large monolith in Australia also known as Ayers Rock?

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The ICAO rules for waypoint names are very loose. They have to be five characters long, they can't be close to another waypoint with the same name (where the definition of "close" can vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction; in most cases, they must be unique within a country), and (in some jurisdictions) they have to be pronounceable. Beyond that, it's up to whatever body was in charge of planning the airspace to pick a name.

So, the answer to your question is "because somebody in the TCCA liked the name".

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Sometimes, fix names are just made up out of whole cloth, having no connection to anyone, anything, or any place. In the USA, fix name reservations are maintained by each ARTCC for use within that ARTCC's Flight Information Region.

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