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I was wondering if there is an equivalent to the blue book of cars for planes that can inform how much a private jet can be sold or bought for if it doesn't have any documentation (for example, no maintenance books, no logs of any kind, no manual) but it's otherwise fully operational? For example how much is the sale price reduced in percentage terms compared to a jet with full documentation?

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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure there is anything like this, it depends on how much of the log books can be reconstructed, and what checks/overhauls need to be performed after the effort. An aircraft without any logs is a significant cost to get airworthy, and that cost depends on a lot of factors. $\endgroup$
    – Ron Beyer
    Nov 8 '21 at 21:38
  • $\begingroup$ You're more likely to find a Blue Book for aircraft with full documentation; having a multi-million $ asset with all documentation lost will be quite rare, since such a loss greatly reduces the value & utility of the aircraft. $\endgroup$
    – Ralph J
    Nov 10 '21 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ @RalphJ Sometimes drug traffickers use and abandon private jets. I was wondering, how much sale value in terms of percentage does a private jet with no documentation lose? $\endgroup$ Nov 10 '21 at 19:36
  • $\begingroup$ @freethinker36 That depends on what percentage of the records can be reconstructed from various sources. $\endgroup$ Nov 10 '21 at 22:14
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There is no "blue book" for aircraft without documentation. Your best bet is to research government and other auction sites that focus on the disposal of repossessed or confiscated aircraft and look at their historical sale records. Here is an example of the type of website you can check. But even with this info you will only get a vague idea of value, because there can be many other factors playing into the final value of such things. This is the kind of niche market where you can easily lose a lot of money if you don't know what you are doing, or make a lot of money if you do.

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The price for a private jet with absolutely no documentation is, and I'm serious here, approximately the scrap value of metal in the plane. Some parts of the plane that are not subject to time or cycle based inspection and maintenance may be of some value depending on their condition.

If no records can be compiled, and no history established, the process of getting the plane certified back into operational status is going to be such a pita, it most likely is not worth the effort.

The possibility that such a plane would emerge is quite small. Unless the plane is reduced to a heap of scrap you'll have serial numbers all over the plane, so at least a part of the history can be tracked down. The longer the period of obscurity for the plane is, the deeper in certain matter a person wishing to operate the plane in a legal manner will be.

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    $\begingroup$ Context: In Guatemala, authorities discovered an abandoned private jet that had entered airspace the day before with drugs. They ordered its destruction the same day it was found, because they argued it was not deemed safe to fly and said they were following FAA regulations. $\endgroup$ Nov 11 '21 at 18:04
  • $\begingroup$ @freethinker36 most likely true reason was, that the plane was not likely to ever enter legal operations again for reasons I mentioned, and if the plane was stored, even for short periods of time, there is a high possibility it would end up in the same business it was doing before, trafficing drugs. Officials were being polite and discrete in their statement, not wanting to suggest a colleague of theirs might "bootleg" the plane to criminals. Destroying it also sends a message that you lose stuff you use for criminal purposes. Although losing a 2million jet for 50 million profit, well... $\endgroup$
    – Jpe61
    Nov 11 '21 at 18:36
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    $\begingroup$ Oh, and it just dawned on me: if you destroy the plane, like completely, you destroy evidence. As I wrote in my answer, the plane's history is easily recovered by a multitude of serial numebers etc, so the officials probably did not wan't that info to get spread out, for whatever reason... $\endgroup$
    – Jpe61
    Nov 11 '21 at 18:41
  • $\begingroup$ A newspaper said a Guatemalan congressman was in that plane, which is why authorities wanted it destroyed asap. Just imagine the state of corruption Guatemala is in... $\endgroup$ Nov 11 '21 at 21:07

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