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Is the Northrop T-38 Talon's CG forward or aft of the center of lift (like the F-16)?

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Unlike conventional aircraft (and older fighters), the CG location of the F-16 makes the airplane unstable (making the aircraft more nimble), requiring fly-by-wire and a flight control computer to stabilize the aircraft. Since the T-38 was designed prior to fly-by-wire technology, I would expect it to have been designed with a CG location that makes the aircraft inherently stable.

If the T-38 does have fly-by-wire, then my answer will get lots of down-votes, but I don't think that is the case looking at this: https://mitindia.edu/images/pdf/avionics_ppt/stability%20and%20agumentation.pdf

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    $\begingroup$ I hate to play grammar police, but double negatives just drive me crazy. They introduce a level of confusion that is just unnecessary. Recommended text: "I would expect it to have been designed with a CG location that makes the aircraft inherently stable." $\endgroup$
    – Gerry
    Nov 7, 2021 at 18:40
  • $\begingroup$ The T-38 most certainly was NOT a fly-by-wire aircraft! Its flight controls are entirely hydraulically powered, but those hydraulics are controlled by the pilot through conventional stick-and-rudders (with essentially a yaw damper to help out with the rudders a bit) -- no fancy computer fly-by-wire used, nor necessary. Sub-sonic, the plane is nimble but not at all unstable; supersonic, it's very stable. It's also much older than fly-by-wire technology; in fact it's a good example of how "inherent stability" is what the F-16 could leave behind with FBW and what you gain for doing so. $\endgroup$
    – Ralph J
    Nov 7, 2021 at 19:34
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    $\begingroup$ @Gerry Done! Thanks $\endgroup$ Nov 8, 2021 at 12:58

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