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How the German Horten Ho 229 flying wing type of aircraft-design, cancel the adverse yaw effect in oblique/ diagonally turns?How the pulley on the controls could mix up to do the dual role (bank and yaw inside the turn to cancel asymmetrical lift)?

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    $\begingroup$ Does this answer your question? How does a flying wing keep from going into a flat spin when maneuvering? → "The Hortens used speed brakes near the wingtips" $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Oct 13, 2021 at 6:14
  • $\begingroup$ The Ho229 does not have splitting ailerons. $\endgroup$
    – George Geo
    Oct 13, 2021 at 8:53
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    $\begingroup$ speed brakes ≠ "splitting ailerons" $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Oct 13, 2021 at 9:02

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Horten Ho 229 used "drag rudders" at the tips of the wing to control yaw:

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Source

These devices are in the family of airbrakes, they create drag, not to be confused with spoilers which destruct lift.

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    $\begingroup$ I think we can be confident that those drag rudders did in fact cause some reduction of lift when deployed. (Unless of course the wings had so much washout that that region of the wing actually created downward lift-- unlikely.) Not to say that you are wrong about the primary purpose for which they were designed, but... $\endgroup$ Oct 13, 2021 at 14:09

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