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When aircraft turbine engine companies sell their engines to aircraft manufacturers, does the product contain the tank and pipe for engine oil and fire extinguishing fluid in the same package? Or is it something that the aircraft manufacturer has to build for the engine independently?

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For turbofan engines used on passengers aircraft, oil system and fire sensor system are part of the engine. This is not the case for fire extinguishers which are manufactured by third parties and installed by aircraft and nacelle manufacturers at the proper locations. The nacelle is the aerodynamic engine housing with the inlet, fan duct and various systems.

In the picture below, showing a final assembly line of a GE factory, the black tank on the fan case is the oil tank:

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Source

Oil tanks and pipes

They are part of the engine because they are deeply interlinked with other engine systems (bearing sumps, gearboxes). If you see a technician on the ground opening some panel on the engine during the aircraft turnaround, it's likely to check the oil level in the tank:

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Top image, CFM56-7B engine: source.
Bottom image: CFM56-7B Component Identification Manual

Fire protection system

For fire protection includes the fire detection system and the fire extinction system. Detection, comprising temperature sensors (fire loops) embedded in the engine, is part of the engine. In the image below, #263 is a sensor loop around the HP turbine at the rear of the engine:

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Image source: CFM56-7B Component Identification Manual

The fire extinction system is composed of gas bottles external to the engine, located in the main wheel wells or the fuselage.

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Image source

The gas has been a halon until 1994 (production stopped to protect ozone) and is now a hydrofluorocarbon. The gaz is released from its bottle using a switch in the cockpit:

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Halon bottles, Boeing 737 NG, source

The gas is then conveyed from the bottle to the engine by pipes running in the fuselage, the wing and the engine nacelle. There is at least one bottle for each engine, and there are other bottles for cargo holds and various protected locations.

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Your question has been expertly answered in great detail. Consider this: Engines of all types are made of metal parts that are spinning against each other. Metal spinning against metal will quickly result in the parts quickly welding themselves together and seizing if they are not separated and protected by a thin coat of oil. Due to the protective lubricating properties of oil you can think of oil as being the "life-blood" of any engine.

Considering that, if an engine company were to produce and deliver an engine without an included oil system, they would essentially be assuring the engine's immediate destruction (or, at a minimum, counting on other engineers who were not involved in designing the engine to design and add an appropriate engine oil system). It would mean that the engine manufacturer had not finished building the engine.

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    $\begingroup$ Then entire question has been expertly answered in great detail. I cannot match the current exhaustive explanation of the fire extinguishing system. I was thinking that if the person who asked the question is brand new to engines, I would tell him a little about why the oil is so extremely important that ANY engine produced without an oiling system would be an incomplete unfinished engine that wasn't ready to be delivered to anyone- not even an aircraft manufacturer. EDIT: Oh, I see that you are mins! Your explanation is fantastic and exhaustive- complete with photos. Great job! $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 4, 2021 at 20:55

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