3
$\begingroup$

Is there a procedure for canopy static discharge before the pilot egresses from the cockpit?

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Any static charge acquired in flight is discharged through the tires. Modern aircraft tires conduct electricity well enough for that... $\endgroup$
    – xxavier
    Aug 18 '21 at 10:34
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I'm confused about why the word "canopy" is included in this question. Can you possibly add a little more detail that would help uninformed readers like me understand what the canopy has to do with concerns about static charge? Is it just because it is made of plexiglass, which is more prone to collecting a static charge than, say, aluminum? $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 0:54
  • $\begingroup$ @SaxonXander monroeaerospace.com/blog/… $\endgroup$
    – xxavier
    Nov 27 '21 at 8:23
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @xxavier Huh. Never heard of that in 5 years of flight line maintenance of large aircraft. Always had to connect a ground to the ramp and then the aircraft. We were taught never to touch the aircraft because the static build up in flight would not be dissipated until the ground was connected. $\endgroup$ Nov 27 '21 at 16:25
6
$\begingroup$

When I was a crew chief on B-52Gs, when we would recover a plane, after wheel chocks were placed, but before the airframe was touched by personnel, a wire was connected to a grounding location in the ramp and connected to a grounding receptacle on the aircraft. Knowing about static bonding, I know that the canopy on smaller aircraft is bonded to the airframe, which means that the static would be dissipated when the grounding wire was attached to the airframe. I have been convinced recently that aircraft tires are made of an electrically conductive material that allows for grounding through them. since this is the case, then the separate ground wire is not for static discharge but rather as a safety measure for refueling. So, the procedure for canopy static discharge is the discharge of static through the tires. The ground crew to grounds the airframe, immediately upon recovery, as a safety measure, but it isn't necessary for static discharge.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.