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In landing gains the flaperons are down 20 degrees. If you have to do corrections of the bank angle on approach then you move upward only one of the flaperons. But after touching the runaway it is the same as in the air?

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  • $\begingroup$ After touching the ground there is no need for corrections so I imagine they act only as flaps in whatever setting is prescribed. $\endgroup$ Jul 22 at 11:37
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think that the case, because all of the aircraft moving on the runaway must be that way. I have seen that in the process of landing in cross winds the correction is to dip one wing. $\endgroup$
    – George Geo
    Jul 22 at 14:03
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The flaperons' deflection when used als trailing edge flaps is controlled based on the landing gear handle position, the ALT FLAPS switch position, the airspeed and the mach number, but is independent of whether the aircraft is airborne or on the ground.

When the landing gear handle is placed in the DN (down) position or the ALT FLAPS switch is placed in the EXTEND position, the flaperons deflect downward. The deflection angle is 20 degrees down at airspeeds less than 240 knots. Since this is also the maximum possible downward deflection of the F-16's flaperons, there is only one way the flaperons can go when performing their function as ailerons, which is up.

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