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The KELP (El Paso) Obstacle Departure Procedure (ODP) says:

Rwy 4, 8R: climbing right turn heading 120° and ELP R-150 to 9000, then proceed on course.

Rwy 22, 26L: climbing left turn heading 120° and ELP R-150 to 9000, then proceed on course.

Do I fly from the VOR or to the VOR on ELP R-150? From: would actually mean I use 150 and fly south east To: would actually mean I use 330 and fly north west

Do you have a reference for the answer?

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In instrument flight, when a Radial is given, it is always the “From” indicated radial on your OBS. In vectoring, turning an aircraft at acute angles is avoided. Flying a Heading of 120° to intercept a Radial of 150°, your only option would be to turn toward a course of 150° degrees (Southeast) until reaching 9000 feet MSL. The field elevation is already almost at 4000 feet MSL. You only have to climb another 5000 feet before you can turn on course. The dead giveaway is the fact that a course of 330° would have you passing in or over the KBIF military Class D. Probably, before you could affect a frequency change

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi. Do you have an AIM ref or other for this? "In instrument flight, when a Radial is given, it is always the “From” indicated radial on your OBS." Thanks $\endgroup$
    – chup
    Commented Jun 13, 2021 at 10:16
  • $\begingroup$ @chup - In various locations in 14CFR like Part 71 & 73, radials are defined as from the NavAid. Per the Instrument Flying Handbook, a radial is defined as - “Radials. The courses oriented from a station.” $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 17:55
  • $\begingroup$ Furthermore, on page 9-10 of the IFH, it states, “The courses oriented FROM the station are called radials. The VOR information received by an aircraft is not influenced by aircraft attitude or heading. [Figure 9-10] Radials can be envisioned to be like the spokes of a wheel on which the aircraft is on one specific radial at any time. For example, aircraft A (heading 180°) is inbound on the 360° radial; after crossing the station, the aircraft is outbound on the 180° radial at A1. Aircraft B is shown crossing the 225° radial...” $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 17:58
  • $\begingroup$ “...Similarly, at any point around the station, an aircraft can be located somewhere on a specific VOR radial. Additionally, a VOR needle on an RMI always points to the course that takes you to the VOR station where conversely the ADF needle points to the station as a RB from the aircraft. In the example above, the ADF needle at position A would be pointed straight ahead, at A1 to the aircraft’s 180° position (tail) and at B to the aircraft’s right.” $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Commented Jun 14, 2021 at 18:03
  • $\begingroup$ Agree with @DeanF - radials are always identified/ named "from" the station. Even if, for example, you were flying "to" a VOR and were physically located Southeast of that VOR tracking inbound (to the VOR) on a course 330 degrees, you would still be on the 150 degree Radial. $\endgroup$
    – user22445
    Commented Jul 19, 2021 at 22:59

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