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Reference the VOR-A Approach to Stellar Airpark (P19), in Chandler, Arizona (shown below):

When JAROD INT is used for missed approach holding the published procedure calls for the aircraft to climb to 3900 feet. The terminal transition from STANFIELD [TFD] to JAROD is a NoPT route at 3900 feet (no holding/course reversal [unless approved by ATC]), and the terminal transition from PHOENIX [PXR] to JAROD is 4700 feet.

Why then is it necessary to publish a hold altitude of (Maximum) 6000 feet and (Minimum) 3900 feet at JAROD when anything other than 3900 feet (missed approach altitude) or 4700 feet ( would seemingly have to be assigned by ATC?

For perspective, I have annotated the position of JAROD and Stellar Airpark (P19) on the Phoenix Terminal Area Chart (IWA R-220, PXR R-150, TFD R-355) shown on the second image below. enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ To my understanding, NoPT does not mean that the hold can not be used as an actual hold. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    May 21 at 16:17
  • $\begingroup$ @DeanF. - If you want to make a turn in holding on a NoPT route you must get approval from ATC. Also, the base of the Class B airspace as the hold is started is 6000 feet. So if you are at 6000 feet you are in the Class B airspace. Note the location above identifying "JAROD INT" $\endgroup$
    – 757toga
    May 21 at 18:35
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So that it keeps you under the shelf of the adjoining bravo airspace and because the decent gradient may be steep enough to require an upper limit. As discussed here:

The instrument approach procedure Holding Pattern In Lieu Of Procedure Turn (HILPT) is designed to facilitate alignment with the final approach course. The descent gradient from the HILPT altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) altitude is limited by TERPS criteria to permit aircraft deceleration and configuration for the final approach. Due to a combination of this descent gradient requirement and the surrounding terrain, it may be necessary to employ a smaller than desired holding pattern template to define the HILPT protected airspace. Use of this smaller template may require the designation of a maximum holding altitude on the 8260-2 Form. This becomes the maximum altitude the aircraft is permitted to enter the HILPT unless ATC can ensure obstacle clearance by keeping the aircraft at or the minimum vectoring altitude (MVA) or the minimum

enter image description here (source) (red circle is roughly where the hold is, arrow points to minimum altitude)

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To add to Dave’s answer...

Just because this hold pattern is used as a Missed Approach holding pattern and as a waypoint when joining the procedure from the IAF VORTAC, it does not mean the hold could not be used for other purposes.

An aircraft could fly to JAROD as an Initial Approach Fix from any direction and use the hold to descend down to 3900 feet MSL. To avoid the Class B airspace, the upper limit of the hold is capped. This gives the non-participating VFR pilot the necessary clearance needed to use the pilot-controlled airport even when not in communication with anyone.

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  • $\begingroup$ If you want to make a turn in holding on a NoPT route you must get approval from ATC. Also, the base of the Class B airspace as the hold is started is 6000 feet. So if you are at 6000 feet you are in the Class B airspace. Note the location above identifying "JAROD INT" $\endgroup$
    – 757toga
    May 21 at 18:36

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