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There are many airports where roads (and pedestrian walkways) are routed underneath taxiways, runways, etc. But are there any airports where airplane taxiways go under/over each other?

I can't imagine there would be (for many logistical and sanity reasons), but in this world of unusual design and construction paradigms, I've learned to not say that something has never been done. This could either be airports that are currently in use, or ones where they were used at one time, but are no longer active.

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    $\begingroup$ A logistical difficulty in putting anything above a taxiway, nevermind another taxiway, is leaving clearance for tall tailfins and for wings much wider than the landing gear. $\endgroup$ Mar 8 at 17:11
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    $\begingroup$ London Gatwick has a pedestrian footbridge over a taxiway. There are a LOT of steps (actually escalators) to get up to it. $\endgroup$
    – Jamiec
    Mar 8 at 17:23
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If you allow taxiway to also mean a surface where an airplane rolls but not under its own power, then there's the lower decks of an aircraft carrier, and Schätz's carousel hangars. Note that even Schätz prefers scissors lifts to multilevel tarmac.

Multilevel tarmac would means ramps between levels, which is commonplace for surface vehicles but rare for airplanes, both in airframe design and in pilot training.

Schätz's aircraft carousel

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The reason is the grading (inclination). There should be enough clearance, and so you need either a very long ramp (which which remove many alternate intersecting, so not really solving problems, if it is at border, just make a parallel taxiway) or a step ramp, which will have many problems: you need a different handling of plane (breaks, power) which pilots are not used, and airplane manufacturers have not certified.

In Switzerland we have few taxiways which go under a road, together a level intersection, but used just for army (ant to go to hangars under mountains). I assume that aircrafts are towed (and military aircrafts are small). In case of war the road is closed and they have normal taxiway. And so you can see aircraft to have two level of taxiways.

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Definitely not. Because taxiways can intersect.

Roadways and taxiways can also intersect, like at Gibraltar, but it is not desirable at busy airports for safety, security, and traffic.

Those usually cost tens to hundreds of millions (USD) to construct.

Note: Wikipedia has a fairly extensive list of runway/taxiway bridges.

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