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I have data from an aircraft which I am trying to understand. One column contains the baro corrected altitude (in ft, e.g. 256) and another the pressure altitude(also in ft, e.g. -44). The two example data points given were measured at the same time.

I have issues finding a definition of the baro corrected altitude. How is it defined and how does it differ from e.g. pressure altitude or other types of altitudes?

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  • $\begingroup$ A baro corrected altimeter is corrected for variations in local pressure and altitude. You will find the altimeter should read field elevation when the altimeter setting is correctly entered (within 75 feet). $\endgroup$ – wbeard52 Mar 7 at 0:02
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Although, I can not find an FAA reference for baro corrected altitude, my understanding is that baro corrected altitude is the Indicated Altitude on a pressure sensitive altimeter when the Kollsman Window is set to the correct current barometric pressure. This may be different than the Indicated Altitude on a non-adjustable/settable altimeter. It may also be different than the Indicated Altitude on a pressure sensitive altimeter set for a non-current altimeter setting.

In contrast, Pressure Altitude is the height above the standard datum plain set at an altitude where the barometric pressure is 29.92 inches of Mercury. You would get Indicated Altitude to match Pressure Altitude by setting the altimeter Kollsman Window to 29.92 inches of Mercury. 5is may not represent the height above Mean Sea Level.

True Altitude is the height above the 19 year average Mean Sea Level. It is consistent regardless of barometric pressure, temperature, humidity, geographic location, etc.

Pressure Altitude is the True Altitude adjusted for non-standard barometric pressure. Indicated Altitude may differ from True Altitude based on what barometric pressure (if ant) is used to calibrate the altimeter. Having to use an altimeter setting from a weather observation (ATIS) not located at the field of use or one that has not yet updated to current.

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