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What front is going to form after a cold air mass meets a warm air mass -- I think it will form a cold front or an occluded front, but I'm not sure.

Today I learned that different fronts gives different weather conditions for flights and I saw the question that I asked and I thought that it will form a cold front because the moving cold mass will collide with the warmer one and it will force the warmer mass to go up. However, I also learned that a cold air mass is moving faster than a warmer one and in the definition of an occluded front it says that the cold one will overtake the warm mass.

Will it form a cold front or an occluded front, or does it depend in what direction the masses are moving?

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ What's the relevance to aviation? Please add this info (press edit), otherwise it's an Earth science question. Also please add how you tried to solve this problem, so any answer can address the correct shortcomings. $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Mar 1, 2021 at 19:58
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    $\begingroup$ @ymb1 presumably not in the US then, but in many other countries meteorology forms part of the pilot licence training. EASA and others have a whole exam dedicated solely on meteorology, and questions like this are extremely typical. So for any pilot outside the US this question is very much relevant to aviation. $\endgroup$
    – Ben
    Mar 1, 2021 at 21:55
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    $\begingroup$ Absolutely agree with Ben here, meteorology is an important part of aviation and this type of question should be considered on topic. $\endgroup$
    – DeltaLima
    Mar 1, 2021 at 21:57
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    $\begingroup$ @DeltaLima: Note my vote was needs clarity, not off-topic. Clarity has been achieved thanks to Grey's edit. Without details, we'll need to guess what problem they faced. Lots of comments can be avoided by checking the timeline :) $\endgroup$
    – user14897
    Mar 1, 2021 at 22:15
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    $\begingroup$ @ymb1 apologies, I misread the close reason. Thank you for reaching out Grey and suggesting how they can improve their answer, and making the final edit. I do have an issue with the moderator intervention here, but I'll address that through Meta $\endgroup$
    – DeltaLima
    Mar 1, 2021 at 22:37

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Weather awareness certainly is a very important part of pretrip planning before even a short local flight.

While cold air masses usually are of higher density than warmer air, wind direction and pressure play key roles.

What makes it a "front" is movement over the ground one way or the other. Cold fronts are usually sharply defined because the denser air moves underneath the warm air and pushes it away. Precipitation can be intense, but short lived, followed by rapid clearing.

If the wind direction is right, such as ahead of a low pressure area (in the northern hemisphere), warm air will advance across the ground. These fronts ride up over the colder air, sometimes for hundreds of miles. They bring lowering and thickening clouds, "showery precipitation", and fog before finally moving through.

Warm fronts are notorious for creating freezing rain under the right conditions and must be approached with caution when flying. Cold fronts primarily carry the risk of severe weather and turbulence.

When cold and warm sit side by side with little movement, or are moving in the same direction (as near the middle of a low), they are said to be occluded.

Another type of front is a "dry line". Humid air is less dense than dry air of the same temperature. Dry lines should be watched as they also can produce severe weather and turbulence (as would that second diagram!).

Generally, the cold front and warm air wind directions are more perpendicular to each other.

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