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I am little curious about international travel. I would like to know what type of visa allows pilots and cabin crews to fly from one country to another? I mean suppose I am pilot of Japan airline and I have trip a for Netherlands. How could I enter to the Netherlands with Japanese citizenship?

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    $\begingroup$ Why is triplane one of the tags? $\endgroup$ – ThatCoolCoder Feb 11 at 5:51
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    $\begingroup$ Wild guess: typo. Edited it away. $\endgroup$ – Jpe61 Feb 11 at 6:25
  • $\begingroup$ I suppose you are asking about a situation where the pilot leaves the aircraft and exits the airport into the foreign country? International airports are "neutral ground" so as long as you stay on the "international" side, no visa is required. $\endgroup$ – Jpe61 Feb 11 at 6:29
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    $\begingroup$ @Jpe61: That is too simple. You might not need a visa, or you might need a simpler "transit" visa, or just an ordinary visa - countries are free to make their own rules, and those could depend on the nationality of the pilot. I'd imagine that quite a few countries would ban El Al pilots altogether. $\endgroup$ – MSalters Feb 11 at 15:15
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    $\begingroup$ Note: it is not a duplicate. The "duplicate question" is about not leaving the plane (or the airport). From the comment of OP in the answer, it seems OP want to do touristy things, so a different case. @Encipher: maybe you should add that information in the question. In any case. I'm voting to reopen the question. $\endgroup$ – Giacomo Catenazzi Feb 12 at 10:32
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International Airline crews often spend 1 or 2 days laying over at the destination. In most countries, airline crew members who are listed on the Aircraft Customs and Immigration General Declaration are exempt from Visa requirements.

Rules will vary from country to country as to how much travelling freedom you have while staying in the layover country. Most countries require you to always have your passport with you and some countries require some kind of form identifying you as airline crew. Some countries have rules defining how far you can travel while on the layover.

In general practice most airline crews I know leave their passports in their room and just carry a photo copy or digital copy with them, and freely travel just as any tourist would do.

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  • $\begingroup$ Are they eligible for country tour, buying souvenirs in short are they eligible to act like a tourist? $\endgroup$ – Encipher Feb 11 at 14:09
  • $\begingroup$ I edited my answer with more info to answer your question. $\endgroup$ – Mike Sowsun Feb 11 at 14:20
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    $\begingroup$ Other countries, like the US, have specific visa categories for plane or boat crew members (in the US e.g. C-1D). $\endgroup$ – dunni Feb 11 at 15:26
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you Mike for the detailed reply. $\endgroup$ – Encipher Feb 12 at 2:19

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