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My question is if a US CFI can give instruction in other countries with an airplane that's not registered in the US (N) (as long as he has certifications to fly those airplanes in other countries)?

Must he be a flight instructor as well in those other countries where the airplane is registered?

The perfect example would be a US CFI who is also rated as a CFI in Argentina. Can he give a Flight Review or training required towards a US PPL certificate in Argentina (with an airplane registered in Argentina)?

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  • $\begingroup$ Your question seems to be about a US CFI instructing in other countries, yet the first sentence refers to regulations about a "required" airplane for instruction and registration issues. Then your last question is about a flight review in an non-N-registered aircraft. Can you please clarify what your question is really about? Are you asking about the CFI's licensing, about using a specific aircraft, or something else? Maybe this makes sense to others, but I'm really lost on what you're asking about. $\endgroup$
    – FreeMan
    Nov 17 '20 at 12:54
  • $\begingroup$ Looking at the edit history, I think the title edit added to the confusion. Are you asking about a US CFI giving flight instruction in the US in a non-US-registered aircraft? (for example: your friend flew his German registered plane to the US and you want to take flight instruction in the US in it?) $\endgroup$
    – FreeMan
    Nov 17 '20 at 12:58
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    $\begingroup$ Guys, sorry for the confusion, I've just updated the post. This would be a US CFI giving instruction in a foreign country towards a US certificate in a foreign aircraft $\endgroup$
    – Ivan Parra
    Nov 17 '20 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ Makes a lot more sense now! (don't know the answer, but at least I understand the question ;) $\endgroup$
    – FreeMan
    Nov 17 '20 at 14:45
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, @FreeMan, and thanks for reading the question $\endgroup$
    – Ivan Parra
    Nov 17 '20 at 14:47
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I can not find any prohibition against a US FAA certificated flight instructor giving instruction in a foreign country for a US FAA issued pilot certificate or endorsements. Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.51 specifically allows a CFI to give instruction in a foreign aircraft registered in a country that is a member state of ICAO. Part 61.41 specifically allows a foreign CFI from a country that is a member state of ICAO to give instruction.

So, this implies that a US CFI can give instruction in a foreign country for a US FAA issued pilot certificate or endorsements. Just as long as the CFI has authorization to fly the foreign registered aircraft in the country of question. Depending on the country, they may need authorization to fly for hire. Depending on the country, they may need authorization to instruct as well. This may only apply to instructing for the issuance of a certificate or endorsement for that country.

So, at the very least, instructing in an aircraft of foreign registry in a foreign country for a US certificate may only require foreign validation of the CFI’s pilot certificate. But, maybe not their instructor certificate.

§61.41 Flight training received from flight instructors not certificated by the FAA. (a) A person may credit flight training toward the requirements of a pilot certificate or rating issued under this part, if that person received the training from:

(1) A flight instructor of an Armed Force in a program for training military pilots of either—

(i) The United States; or

(ii) A foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation.

(2) A flight instructor who is authorized to give such training by the licensing authority of a foreign contracting State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, and the flight training is given outside the United States.

(b) A flight instructor described in paragraph (a) of this section is only authorized to give endorsements to show training given.

§61.51 Pilot logbooks. (j) Aircraft requirements for logging flight time. For a person to log flight time, the time must be acquired in an aircraft that is identified as an aircraft under §61.5(b), and is—

(1) An aircraft of U.S. registry with either a standard or special airworthiness certificate;

(2) An aircraft of foreign registry with an airworthiness certificate that is approved by the aviation authority of a foreign country that is a Member State to the Convention on International Civil Aviation Organization;

(3) A military aircraft under the direct operational control of the U.S. Armed Forces; or

(4) A public aircraft under the direct operational control of a Federal, State, county, or municipal law enforcement agency, if the flight time was acquired by the pilot while engaged on an official law enforcement flight for a Federal, State, County, or Municipal law enforcement agency.

§61.195 Flight instructor limitations and qualifications. A person who holds a flight instructor certificate is subject to the following limitations:

(a) Hours of training. In any 24-consecutive-hour period, a flight instructor may not conduct more than 8 hours of flight training.

(b) Aircraft Ratings. Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a flight instructor may not conduct flight training in any aircraft unless the flight instructor:

(1) Holds a flight instructor certificate with the applicable category and class rating;

(2) Holds a pilot certificate with the applicable category and class rating; and

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes, I've been reading the same regulations... So a US CFI is just needed for the practical test recommendation, other than that an applicant can request a PPL checkride with experience done with a non US CFI outside of the US $\endgroup$
    – Ivan Parra
    Nov 17 '20 at 15:19
  • $\begingroup$ There have been ads for US FAA CFI employment in the Middle East for training in the Cessna 172. This may be due to this loophole. At least I call it a loophole. It may be an intentional oversight by the FAA and ICAO. Also, when I pursued certificate validation in South Africa, the flight school there actually offered a program to get FAA and EASA certification. I believe you still had to go to the US or Europe for your checkride. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Nov 17 '20 at 15:35
  • $\begingroup$ @IvanParra - As far as needing a US FAA CFI recommendation for the checkride, Part 61.39 states, “(6) Have an endorsement, if required by this part, in the applicant’s logbook or training record that has been signed by an authorized instructor who certifies that the applicant—“ It is a little ambiguous on what “authorized“ means. Normally, they would use the word “certificated”.Especially since the checkride endorsement is only attesting to the fact that training has been accomplished and the applicant is ready. $\endgroup$
    – Dean F.
    Nov 17 '20 at 15:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yes you are right, but a foreign CFI hasn't an IACRA account to sign the application form $\endgroup$
    – Ivan Parra
    Nov 17 '20 at 16:33
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    $\begingroup$ I agree that a foreign CFI in their home country can provide instruction that qualifies for the aeronautical experience for FAA certificates and ratings. What these foreign CFIs cannot do is to prepare them for and sign off as the recommending instructor on the 8710. Personally, I would never sign off an applicant for a certificate or rating without flying with them for a minimum of three hours as required by the FARs as preparation for the practical test. $\endgroup$
    – wbeard52
    Nov 17 '20 at 18:02

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