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I have searched for articles on Thermal Analysis of Propeller but couldn't find one. Can I assume the aircraft company don't perform heat transfer simulation and analysis of high speed propeller? Isn't that important? What kind of simulation can be done of propeller besides the flow simulation of propeller obtaining drag, thrust and efficiency of it? Thank you.

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  • $\begingroup$ Why would you think one should do a thermal analysis of a propeller? $\endgroup$ – Sanchises Oct 19 '20 at 11:13
  • $\begingroup$ Propellers aren't "high speed", once the blade tips hit the sound barrier things don't work out very well, and that's pretty easy to do even with small diameter propellers... $\endgroup$ – Ron Beyer Oct 19 '20 at 11:34
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    $\begingroup$ "What kind of simulation can be done of propeller besides the flow simulation of propeller obtaining drag, thrust and efficiency of it?" This is a strangely open ended-question. Are you looking for a thesis topic or something? If that's what you're after, then structural analysis or aeroelasticity is one. $\endgroup$ – DKNguyen Oct 19 '20 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ @DKNguyen Yea i am thinking the same. $\endgroup$ – Auberron Oct 19 '20 at 16:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Auberron you are "thinking the same"... what? Please edit your question to include all relevant details. $\endgroup$ – FreeMan Oct 19 '20 at 17:56
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As a propeller turns through the air at subsonic speeds, the dynamics of creating the pressure distributions in the air surrounding the propeller blade can be accurately modeled as being isothermal (no significant and persistent temperature gradients are created) and adiabatic (no significant net heat transfer from one location to another occurs within the flow field).

This means that the thermodynamic state of the air coming into the propeller disc is almost exactly the same as its state when exiting it, and for this reason there is no significant thermodynamic analysis needed to successfully account for the behavior of a propeller as long as it is subsonic.

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  • $\begingroup$ Adiabatic and isothermal are mutually exclusive. I think you mean adiabatic in the thermodynamic sense (when calculating the compressibility of air), and isothermal in the sense that you don't take into account temperature dependency on the gas properties? $\endgroup$ – Sanchises Oct 19 '20 at 20:11
  • $\begingroup$ you are probably right. $\endgroup$ – niels nielsen Oct 20 '20 at 3:17

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