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I want to become an aerospace engineering but want to be specialized in Aerodynamics. How do I do this in college?

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    $\begingroup$ You would study aerodynamics, it's that simple. Some constructive criticism here, you have several questions here about aviation careers, and have already received replies and helpful comments even on the ones that have been closed. They are all summed up by 'study your ass off, get very good grades, learn a crap-ton of math, and get into a really good university with an actual aerospace engineering program'. There's no magic here, and no easy answers. $\endgroup$ – GdD Aug 18 '20 at 20:55
  • $\begingroup$ Ok thanks! What math would you say is the most important to take? $\endgroup$ – Luke Justin Aug 18 '20 at 22:14
  • $\begingroup$ The math courses required for your degree. Reach out to a couple university aero engineering departments. Start with their web sites. There are plenty of people there that will gladly explain their programs and what it takes to 1. get in, and 2. graduate. $\endgroup$ – Gerry Aug 18 '20 at 22:20
  • $\begingroup$ Find out what colleges offer Aero as a major, and set your sights on those. Not everybody does, but the ones that do are the ones that will do what you're looking for. All of that being said, college counseling isn't really on-topic at Av.SE. $\endgroup$ – Ralph J Aug 18 '20 at 23:29
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    $\begingroup$ @LukeJustin I truly have the answer on "which math". ALL MATH. $\endgroup$ – Fattie Aug 19 '20 at 14:09
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I'm going to speak for a North American post-secondary experience. The simple answer is, you don't get to specialize in any particular domain within aerospace engineering as an undergraduate, even if your major is aerospace engineering. Why? Because you don't know anything yet for you to specialize. How can you know what you like, if you don't know anything yet?

The first two years of college are foundational studies, during which the courses and materials are more or less the same across any engineering field. You mentioned aerodynamics. Well, you can't do aerodynamics if you don't know linear algebra, vector calculus or basic fluid dynamics. The last two years would be more tailored to your major, but these will only give you a general gist of all the major domains that aerospace touches.

You get to specialize once you enter industry, or if you choose to pursue even higher educations (Master's, PhD, professorship). Whatever it is, what you ended up specializing will probably be very different than what you thought you'd be doing at the start of college, either because of change of interest (now that you know what the fields actually are), or monetary reasons (field A is more lucrative than field B), or pragmatic reasons (because field A has N openings and field B has zero).

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    $\begingroup$ That last set of reasons is very real. You go where here's a job. I spent 4 years of college thinking I was going to work in airplane development. I ended up spending the first 9 years of my career in launch vehicles - a rocket 'scientist'. Some of the most fun jobs ever. The last 25 years have been in avionics, various comm, nav and surveillance systems. Never could have imagined the path I took and where I am now (except my soon to be next job - retiree.) $\endgroup$ – Gerry Aug 18 '20 at 22:13

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