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In the video below an A5 had an accident after takeoff. The final cause of the accident seems to be a sharp increase of AOA above stall.

Do sea planes have an alternate technique for takeoff from tight spaces. Let me draw what I mean: enter image description here So in case 1 take distance available for T/O is not enough. Is there a procedure such as in case 2, where you use one side of the lake to accelerate to some speed and then turn to main leg to complete the takeoff?

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    $\begingroup$ That video is an example of poor airmanship. $\endgroup$ – GdD Aug 7 '20 at 9:51
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Yes when I was bush flying in Northern Ontario (C-185 on straight floats) I used turning takeoff runs from time to time when loaded and with limited space. You start the turn once on the step. Step turns are a normal skill on floats although it's not a good idea to do it on choppy water in high winds.

The guy in the video had insufficient space to take off even with the turning takeoff run and it looks like he couldn't be bother to head farther down the lake to get a better into wind run. I wouldn't have done a turning takeoff like that in that sort of windy chop. I would've started right at the far shoreline as far as I could go, and determined a go-no-go point using a landmark that was about 2/3rds of the total run. If you're not airborne fairly quickly (by water takeoff standards) in that kind of wind and waves, something is really wrong or your airplane is grossly underpowered. I suspect that guy was overweight.

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    $\begingroup$ The mushing descent near the end made me wince $\endgroup$ – Jamiec Aug 7 '20 at 14:12
  • $\begingroup$ One prob is you have subsiding air flowing onto the water from the shoreline because of a bit of downhill slope effect which can take a couple hundred fpm off your rate of climb below 300 ft from the surface. I would get airborne and stay right on the surface to gain extra energy and speed margin and zoom climb through the subsidence. One of the many hazards most land pilots never have to deal with, beyond boaters etc.I used to do float ratings and always started the first briefing with "Floatplanes are easy to to learn. It's a big stable catamaran. The HARD part is staying out of trouble." $\endgroup$ – John K Aug 7 '20 at 17:05
  • $\begingroup$ I can't see how the pilot thought that was going to work. They could have gone to the far end of the lake and started the run, doing a much more gentle turn to gain a bit more of a run. Instead they put themself into a situation where they had to do a tight turn immediately to avoid trees. Sad. $\endgroup$ – GdD Aug 7 '20 at 17:34
  • $\begingroup$ One of the biggest challenges (and satisfactions if you thrive on living-by-your-wits ambiguity) is dealing with the "shades of grey" of bush flying as opposed to go-no-go numbers you can rely on in normal flying. All up weight when loading in a remote place? Educated guess. Takeoff distance available? Looks long enough; try it, but be ready to bail. Shoals and deadheads? Keep a look out (I ran aground on a shoal once while taxiing). Boaters wanting to race you? As long as they stay far enough away but keep an eye. Weather? A mile and 500 ft ceiling can be sufficient for some trips. $\endgroup$ – John K Aug 7 '20 at 17:58

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